Breaking bad news--parents' experience of learning that their child has leukaemia.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209242
Title:
Breaking bad news--parents' experience of learning that their child has leukaemia.
Authors:
Oshea, J; Smith, O; O'Marcaigh, A; McMahon, C; Geoghegan, R; Cotter, M
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatrics, Cork University Hospital, Cork. jemos2@yahoo.co.uk
Citation:
Ir Med J. 2007 Oct;100(9):588-90.
Journal:
Irish medical journal
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209242
PubMed ID:
18196882
Abstract:
This study aimed to seek parents' experiences of how they learned their child had leukaemia and therefore identify ways of improving this process. To achieve this task a questionnaire was designed to ask parents about specific elements of the initial interview and give them opportunity to add their thoughts and feelings on the subject. All children with a diagnosis of leukaemia over an eighteen-year period were identified and parents of those children still alive were invited to partake in the study. 49 out of 50 families agreed to participate of which 35 (72%) returned completed questionnaires. The majority 29 (83%) expressed overall satisfaction. Their replies confirmed some findings of previous studies, and also offered some new insights. Examples of new findings or expansion on previous findings include observations on the presence of young children at the initial interview; the importance of the language used in conveying the diagnosis and prognostic information, and a preference for actuarial terms when discussing prognosis. Telling parents their child has leukaemia is a challenging and important task. The experience of parents gives us valuable insights into our own communication skills and highlights areas of possible improvement in this difficult area.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
*Adaptation, Psychological; *Attitude to Health; Child; *Child Welfare; *Communication; Humans; Interviews as Topic; Leukemia/diagnosis/*psychology; Parent-Child Relations; Parents/*psychology; Personal Satisfaction; *Professional-Family Relations; Prognosis; Questionnaires; Retrospective Studies
ISSN:
0332-3102 (Print); 0332-3102 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOshea, Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Oen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Marcaigh, Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcMahon, Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGeoghegan, Ren_GB
dc.contributor.authorCotter, Men_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:16:01Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:16:01Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:16:01Z-
dc.identifier.citationIr Med J. 2007 Oct;100(9):588-90.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid18196882en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/209242-
dc.description.abstractThis study aimed to seek parents' experiences of how they learned their child had leukaemia and therefore identify ways of improving this process. To achieve this task a questionnaire was designed to ask parents about specific elements of the initial interview and give them opportunity to add their thoughts and feelings on the subject. All children with a diagnosis of leukaemia over an eighteen-year period were identified and parents of those children still alive were invited to partake in the study. 49 out of 50 families agreed to participate of which 35 (72%) returned completed questionnaires. The majority 29 (83%) expressed overall satisfaction. Their replies confirmed some findings of previous studies, and also offered some new insights. Examples of new findings or expansion on previous findings include observations on the presence of young children at the initial interview; the importance of the language used in conveying the diagnosis and prognostic information, and a preference for actuarial terms when discussing prognosis. Telling parents their child has leukaemia is a challenging and important task. The experience of parents gives us valuable insights into our own communication skills and highlights areas of possible improvement in this difficult area.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Adaptation, Psychologicalen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Attitude to Healthen_GB
dc.subject.meshChilden_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Child Welfareen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Communicationen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshInterviews as Topicen_GB
dc.subject.meshLeukemia/diagnosis/*psychologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshParent-Child Relationsen_GB
dc.subject.meshParents/*psychologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshPersonal Satisfactionen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Professional-Family Relationsen_GB
dc.subject.meshPrognosisen_GB
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_GB
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_GB
dc.titleBreaking bad news--parents' experience of learning that their child has leukaemia.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Paediatrics, Cork University Hospital, Cork. jemos2@yahoo.co.uken_GB
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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