Coronary artery bypass surgery in the diabetic patient.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209240
Title:
Coronary artery bypass surgery in the diabetic patient.
Authors:
Maher, M; Singh, H P; Dias, S; Street, J; Aherne, T
Affiliation:
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Cork University Hospital.
Citation:
Ir J Med Sci. 1995 Apr-Jun;164(2):136-8.
Journal:
Irish journal of medical science
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209240
PubMed ID:
7607839
Abstract:
Coronary artery and peripheral occlusive arterial disease frequently complicate diabetes mellitus, with death due to atherosclerotic coronary artery disease being three times more likely in diabetic compared to non-diabetic patients. The profile of 32 diabetic patients and 32 matched controls who underwent coronary artery bypass (CABG) is studied and their early and late postoperative outcomes are described. The mean age was 61 +/- 1 year in both groups. The diabetic group comprised 26 non-insulin dependent and 6 insulin dependent diabetics, who had a mean duration of diabetes of 8.5 years (range 2 months--35 years). The median number of grafts per patient performed in the diabetic group and the control group was 3.5 and 3 respectively. There was no mortality in the series, however considerably greater wound morbidity rates were encountered in the diabetic group when compared to matched controls. One renal transplant patient in the diabetic group suffered irreversible acute tubular necrosis and became dialysis dependent post-operatively. Longterm follow-up showed no longterm mortality in either group, with full relief of angina achieved in 75% of diabetic patients compared with 87.5% of matched controls. In addition diabetic patients suffered greater longterm cardiac morbidity than the control group (21.8% versus 12.5%). The results of this study suggest that CABG is a safe operation for the diabetic patient. Diabetic patients receive satisfactory symptomatic relief of angina, but suffer increased perioperative wound complications and greater incidence of longterm cardiac morbidity.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
*Coronary Artery Bypass/adverse effects; Coronary Disease/*complications/*surgery; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/*complications; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*complications; Female; Graft Survival; Humans; Incidence; Male; Matched-Pair Analysis; Middle Aged; Morbidity; *Postoperative Complications/epidemiology; Prognosis
ISSN:
0021-1265 (Print); 0021-1265 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMaher, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorSingh, H Pen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDias, Sen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStreet, Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAherne, Ten_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:15:59Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:15:59Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:15:59Z-
dc.identifier.citationIr J Med Sci. 1995 Apr-Jun;164(2):136-8.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0021-1265 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0021-1265 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid7607839en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/209240-
dc.description.abstractCoronary artery and peripheral occlusive arterial disease frequently complicate diabetes mellitus, with death due to atherosclerotic coronary artery disease being three times more likely in diabetic compared to non-diabetic patients. The profile of 32 diabetic patients and 32 matched controls who underwent coronary artery bypass (CABG) is studied and their early and late postoperative outcomes are described. The mean age was 61 +/- 1 year in both groups. The diabetic group comprised 26 non-insulin dependent and 6 insulin dependent diabetics, who had a mean duration of diabetes of 8.5 years (range 2 months--35 years). The median number of grafts per patient performed in the diabetic group and the control group was 3.5 and 3 respectively. There was no mortality in the series, however considerably greater wound morbidity rates were encountered in the diabetic group when compared to matched controls. One renal transplant patient in the diabetic group suffered irreversible acute tubular necrosis and became dialysis dependent post-operatively. Longterm follow-up showed no longterm mortality in either group, with full relief of angina achieved in 75% of diabetic patients compared with 87.5% of matched controls. In addition diabetic patients suffered greater longterm cardiac morbidity than the control group (21.8% versus 12.5%). The results of this study suggest that CABG is a safe operation for the diabetic patient. Diabetic patients receive satisfactory symptomatic relief of angina, but suffer increased perioperative wound complications and greater incidence of longterm cardiac morbidity.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Coronary Artery Bypass/adverse effectsen_GB
dc.subject.meshCoronary Disease/*complications/*surgeryen_GB
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus, Type 1/*complicationsen_GB
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*complicationsen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshGraft Survivalen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMatched-Pair Analysisen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshMorbidityen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Postoperative Complications/epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshPrognosisen_GB
dc.titleCoronary artery bypass surgery in the diabetic patient.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Cork University Hospital.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalIrish journal of medical scienceen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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