Trends in the aetiology of facial fractures in the south of Ireland (1975-1993).

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209220
Title:
Trends in the aetiology of facial fractures in the south of Ireland (1975-1993).
Authors:
Carroll, S M; O'Connor, T P
Affiliation:
Plastic Surgery Department, Cork University Hospital.
Citation:
Ir Med J. 1996 Sep-Oct;89(5):188-9.
Journal:
Irish medical journal
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209220
PubMed ID:
8936845
Abstract:
An aetiological review of 332 patients with facial fractures seen in a 1 year period (1993) was carried out and compared to a similar study of 266 patients, performed in this unit in 1975. Males predominated in both years. Two thirds of fractures occurred in the second and third decades. Road traffic accident (RTA) related facial fractures decreased from 27% of the total in 1975 to 17% in 1993. Assault related facial fractures increased from 18% of the total in 1975 to 27% in 1993. In both study periods nasal fractures were the most common facial fracture seen and sport was the most common cause of facial fracture. The number of patients undergoing surgery increased from 67% of the total to 79% over the same period.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adolescent; Adult; Age Distribution; Aged; Child; Facial Bones/*injuries; Female; Humans; Incidence; Ireland/epidemiology; Male; Middle Aged; Reference Values; Risk Factors; Sex Distribution; *Skull Fractures/epidemiology/etiology
ISSN:
0332-3102 (Print); 0332-3102 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCarroll, S Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, T Pen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:15:26Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:15:26Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:15:26Z-
dc.identifier.citationIr Med J. 1996 Sep-Oct;89(5):188-9.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid8936845en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/209220-
dc.description.abstractAn aetiological review of 332 patients with facial fractures seen in a 1 year period (1993) was carried out and compared to a similar study of 266 patients, performed in this unit in 1975. Males predominated in both years. Two thirds of fractures occurred in the second and third decades. Road traffic accident (RTA) related facial fractures decreased from 27% of the total in 1975 to 17% in 1993. Assault related facial fractures increased from 18% of the total in 1975 to 27% in 1993. In both study periods nasal fractures were the most common facial fracture seen and sport was the most common cause of facial fracture. The number of patients undergoing surgery increased from 67% of the total to 79% over the same period.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshAge Distributionen_GB
dc.subject.meshAgeden_GB
dc.subject.meshChilden_GB
dc.subject.meshFacial Bones/*injuriesen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen_GB
dc.subject.meshIreland/epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshReference Valuesen_GB
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_GB
dc.subject.meshSex Distributionen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Skull Fractures/epidemiology/etiologyen_GB
dc.titleTrends in the aetiology of facial fractures in the south of Ireland (1975-1993).en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentPlastic Surgery Department, Cork University Hospital.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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