Proinflammatory effects of bacterial lipoprotein on human neutrophil activation status, function and cytotoxic potential in vitro.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209078
Title:
Proinflammatory effects of bacterial lipoprotein on human neutrophil activation status, function and cytotoxic potential in vitro.
Authors:
Power, C; Wang, J H; Sookhai, S; Wu, Q D; Redmond, H P
Affiliation:
Department of Academic Surgery, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Ireland.
Citation:
Shock. 2001 Jun;15(6):461-6.
Journal:
Shock (Augusta, Ga.)
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209078
PubMed ID:
11386619
Abstract:
Bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) is the most abundant protein in gram-negative bacterial cell walls, heavily outweighing lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Herein we present findings demonstrating the potent in vitro effects of BLP on neutrophil (PMN) activation status, function, and capacity to transmigrate an endothelial monolayer. PMNs are the principal effectors of the initial host response to injury or infection and constitute a significant threat to invading bacterial pathogens. The systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is characterised by significant host tissue injury mediated, in part, by uncontrolled regulation of PMN cytotoxic activity. We found that BLP-activated human PMN as evidenced by increased CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1) expression. Up-regulation of PMN Mac-1 in response to BLP occurred independently of membrane-bound CD14 (mCD14). A similar up-regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on endothelial cells was observed whilst E-Selectin expression was unaffected. PMN transmigration across a human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayer was markedly increased after treating either PMN's or HUVEC independently with BLP. This increased transmigration did not occur as a result of any direct effect of BLP on HUVEC monolayer permeability, assessed objectively using the passage of FITC-labeled Dextran-70. BLP primed PMN for enhanced respiratory burst and superoxide anion production in response to PMA, but did not influence phagocytosis of opsonized Escherichia coli. BLP far exceeds LPS as a gram-negative bacterial wall component, these findings therefore implicate BLP as an additional putative mediator of SIRS arising from gram-negative infection.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Antigens, CD/blood; Antigens, CD18/blood/genetics; Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins/*pharmacology; Cells, Cultured; Chemotaxis, Leukocyte/drug effects/physiology; E-Selectin/genetics; Endothelium, Vascular/cytology/drug effects/*physiology; *Gram-Negative Bacteria; Humans; Inflammation; Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1/genetics; Macrophage-1 Antigen/blood/genetics; Neutrophil Activation/drug effects/*physiology; Neutrophils/drug effects/*physiology; Phagocytosis/*physiology; Respiratory Burst/drug effects/physiology; Superoxides/blood; Umbilical Veins
ISSN:
1073-2322 (Print); 1073-2322 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPower, Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWang, J Hen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSookhai, Sen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWu, Q Den_GB
dc.contributor.authorRedmond, H Pen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:11:40Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:11:40Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:11:40Z-
dc.identifier.citationShock. 2001 Jun;15(6):461-6.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1073-2322 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1073-2322 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid11386619en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/209078-
dc.description.abstractBacterial lipoprotein (BLP) is the most abundant protein in gram-negative bacterial cell walls, heavily outweighing lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Herein we present findings demonstrating the potent in vitro effects of BLP on neutrophil (PMN) activation status, function, and capacity to transmigrate an endothelial monolayer. PMNs are the principal effectors of the initial host response to injury or infection and constitute a significant threat to invading bacterial pathogens. The systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is characterised by significant host tissue injury mediated, in part, by uncontrolled regulation of PMN cytotoxic activity. We found that BLP-activated human PMN as evidenced by increased CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1) expression. Up-regulation of PMN Mac-1 in response to BLP occurred independently of membrane-bound CD14 (mCD14). A similar up-regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on endothelial cells was observed whilst E-Selectin expression was unaffected. PMN transmigration across a human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayer was markedly increased after treating either PMN's or HUVEC independently with BLP. This increased transmigration did not occur as a result of any direct effect of BLP on HUVEC monolayer permeability, assessed objectively using the passage of FITC-labeled Dextran-70. BLP primed PMN for enhanced respiratory burst and superoxide anion production in response to PMA, but did not influence phagocytosis of opsonized Escherichia coli. BLP far exceeds LPS as a gram-negative bacterial wall component, these findings therefore implicate BLP as an additional putative mediator of SIRS arising from gram-negative infection.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAntigens, CD/blooden_GB
dc.subject.meshAntigens, CD18/blood/geneticsen_GB
dc.subject.meshBacterial Outer Membrane Proteins/*pharmacologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshCells, Cultureden_GB
dc.subject.meshChemotaxis, Leukocyte/drug effects/physiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshE-Selectin/geneticsen_GB
dc.subject.meshEndothelium, Vascular/cytology/drug effects/*physiologyen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Gram-Negative Bacteriaen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshInflammationen_GB
dc.subject.meshIntercellular Adhesion Molecule-1/geneticsen_GB
dc.subject.meshMacrophage-1 Antigen/blood/geneticsen_GB
dc.subject.meshNeutrophil Activation/drug effects/*physiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshNeutrophils/drug effects/*physiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshPhagocytosis/*physiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshRespiratory Burst/drug effects/physiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshSuperoxides/blooden_GB
dc.subject.meshUmbilical Veinsen_GB
dc.titleProinflammatory effects of bacterial lipoprotein on human neutrophil activation status, function and cytotoxic potential in vitro.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Academic Surgery, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalShock (Augusta, Ga.)en_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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