Rotavirus in Ireland: national estimates of disease burden, 1997 to 1998.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209072
Title:
Rotavirus in Ireland: national estimates of disease burden, 1997 to 1998.
Authors:
Lynch, M; O'Halloran, F; Whyte, D; Fanning, S; Cryan, B; Glass, R I
Affiliation:
Department of Medical Microbiology, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Ireland., mlynch@cdc.gov
Citation:
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2001 Jul;20(7):693-8.
Journal:
The Pediatric infectious disease journal
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209072
PubMed ID:
11465842
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: We estimated the disease burden caused by rotavirus hospitalizations in the Republic of Ireland by using national data on the number of hospitalizations for diarrhea in children and laboratory surveillance of confirmed rotavirus detections. METHODS: We examined trends in diarrheal hospitalizations among children <5 years old as coded by ICD-9-CM for the period January, 1997, to December, 1998. We collated data on laboratory-confirmed rotavirus detections nationally for the same period among children <2 years old. We calculated the overall contribution of rotavirus to laboratory-confirmed intestinal disease in children <5 years old from INFOSCAN, a disease bulletin for one-third of the population. We compared data from all sources and estimated the proportion of diarrheal hospitalizations that are likely the result of rotavirus in children <5 years old. RESULTS: In children <5 years old, 9% of all hospitalizations are for diarrheal illness. In this age group 1 in 8 are hospitalized for a diarrheal illness, and 1 in 17 are hospitalized for rotavirus by 5 years of age. In hospitalized children <2 years old, 1 in 38 have a laboratory confirmed rotavirus infection. CONCLUSIONS: The disease burden of rotavirus hospitalizations is higher than in other industrialized countries. Access to comprehensive national databases may have contributed to the high hospitalization rates, as well as a greater tendency to hospitalize children with diarrhea in Ireland.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Child, Preschool; *Cost of Illness; Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data; Humans; Incidence; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Ireland/epidemiology; Patient Discharge/statistics & numerical data; Rotavirus/isolation & purification; Rotavirus Infections/economics/*epidemiology; Seasons; Sentinel Surveillance
ISSN:
0891-3668 (Print); 0891-3668 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLynch, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Halloran, Fen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWhyte, Den_GB
dc.contributor.authorFanning, Sen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCryan, Ben_GB
dc.contributor.authorGlass, R Ien_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:11:31Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:11:31Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:11:31Z-
dc.identifier.citationPediatr Infect Dis J. 2001 Jul;20(7):693-8.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0891-3668 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0891-3668 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid11465842en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/209072-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: We estimated the disease burden caused by rotavirus hospitalizations in the Republic of Ireland by using national data on the number of hospitalizations for diarrhea in children and laboratory surveillance of confirmed rotavirus detections. METHODS: We examined trends in diarrheal hospitalizations among children <5 years old as coded by ICD-9-CM for the period January, 1997, to December, 1998. We collated data on laboratory-confirmed rotavirus detections nationally for the same period among children <2 years old. We calculated the overall contribution of rotavirus to laboratory-confirmed intestinal disease in children <5 years old from INFOSCAN, a disease bulletin for one-third of the population. We compared data from all sources and estimated the proportion of diarrheal hospitalizations that are likely the result of rotavirus in children <5 years old. RESULTS: In children <5 years old, 9% of all hospitalizations are for diarrheal illness. In this age group 1 in 8 are hospitalized for a diarrheal illness, and 1 in 17 are hospitalized for rotavirus by 5 years of age. In hospitalized children <2 years old, 1 in 38 have a laboratory confirmed rotavirus infection. CONCLUSIONS: The disease burden of rotavirus hospitalizations is higher than in other industrialized countries. Access to comprehensive national databases may have contributed to the high hospitalization rates, as well as a greater tendency to hospitalize children with diarrhea in Ireland.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Cost of Illnessen_GB
dc.subject.meshHospitalization/statistics & numerical dataen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen_GB
dc.subject.meshInfanten_GB
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_GB
dc.subject.meshIreland/epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshPatient Discharge/statistics & numerical dataen_GB
dc.subject.meshRotavirus/isolation & purificationen_GB
dc.subject.meshRotavirus Infections/economics/*epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshSeasonsen_GB
dc.subject.meshSentinel Surveillanceen_GB
dc.titleRotavirus in Ireland: national estimates of disease burden, 1997 to 1998.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medical Microbiology, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Ireland., mlynch@cdc.goven_GB
dc.identifier.journalThe Pediatric infectious disease journalen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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