Ingested foreign bodies in the paediatric patient.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209070
Title:
Ingested foreign bodies in the paediatric patient.
Authors:
O'Brien, G C; Winter, D C; Kirwan, W O; Redmond, H P
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland.
Citation:
Ir J Med Sci. 2001 Apr-Jun;170(2):100-2.
Journal:
Irish journal of medical science
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209070
PubMed ID:
11491042
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Paediatric foreign body (FB) ingestion is a common problem and while most can be managed conservatively, a sub-population require intervention. AIMS: To establish clear guidelines for management of paediatric FB ingestion. METHODS: A retrospective chart review analysing all paediatric admissions with FB ingestion over a 10-year period from 1990 to 1999. RESULTS: Of 339 patients presenting to the accident and emergency department with FB ingestion, 59 required admission. Ingestion was accidental in 93.0% of patients. The reasons for admission were as follows: large FBs; dangerous FBs; and living far from the hospital. Nineteen patients (32.2%) were discharged without intervention. Thirty-seven (62.7%) required endoscopic retrieval. In two, the FB was not identified at endoscopy. Only three (5%) required surgery. CONCLUSION: Conservative management of FB ingestion in the paediatric population is possible in the majority of cases. However, a minority require intervention. While guidelines for intervention are ill-defined, definitive indications include symptomatic patients, or dangerous objects.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adolescent; Child; Child, Preschool; *Digestive System; Female; Foreign Bodies/epidemiology/etiology/*therapy; Humans; Infant; Male; Retrospective Studies
ISSN:
0021-1265 (Print); 0021-1265 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Brien, G Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWinter, D Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKirwan, W Oen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRedmond, H Pen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:11:28Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:11:28Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:11:28Z-
dc.identifier.citationIr J Med Sci. 2001 Apr-Jun;170(2):100-2.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0021-1265 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0021-1265 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid11491042en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/209070-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Paediatric foreign body (FB) ingestion is a common problem and while most can be managed conservatively, a sub-population require intervention. AIMS: To establish clear guidelines for management of paediatric FB ingestion. METHODS: A retrospective chart review analysing all paediatric admissions with FB ingestion over a 10-year period from 1990 to 1999. RESULTS: Of 339 patients presenting to the accident and emergency department with FB ingestion, 59 required admission. Ingestion was accidental in 93.0% of patients. The reasons for admission were as follows: large FBs; dangerous FBs; and living far from the hospital. Nineteen patients (32.2%) were discharged without intervention. Thirty-seven (62.7%) required endoscopic retrieval. In two, the FB was not identified at endoscopy. Only three (5%) required surgery. CONCLUSION: Conservative management of FB ingestion in the paediatric population is possible in the majority of cases. However, a minority require intervention. While guidelines for intervention are ill-defined, definitive indications include symptomatic patients, or dangerous objects.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_GB
dc.subject.meshChilden_GB
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Digestive Systemen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshForeign Bodies/epidemiology/etiology/*therapyen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshInfanten_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_GB
dc.titleIngested foreign bodies in the paediatric patient.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalIrish journal of medical scienceen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.