Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209068
Title:
Small intestinal transplantation.
Authors:
Quigley, E M
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, Cork University Hospital, Central Sciences Building,, Cork, Ireland. e.quigley@ucc.ie
Citation:
Curr Gastroenterol Rep. 2001 Oct;3(5):408-11.
Journal:
Current gastroenterology reports
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209068
PubMed ID:
11560798
Abstract:
The past few years have witnessed a considerable shift in the clinical status of intestinal transplantation. A great deal of experience has been gained at the most active centers, and results comparable with those reported at a similar stage in the development of other solid-organ graft programs are now being achieved by these highly proficient transplant teams. Rejection and its inevitable associate, sepsis, remain ubiquitous, and new immunosuppressant regimes are urgently needed; some may already be on the near horizon. The recent success of isolated intestinal grafts, together with the mortality and morbidity attendant upon the development of advanced liver disease related to total parenteral nutrition, has prompted the bold proposal that patients at risk for this complication should be identified and should receive isolated small bowel grafts before the onset of end-stage hepatic failure. The very fact that such a suggestion has begun to emerge reflects real progress in this challenging field.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adult; Child; Graft Rejection/complications/drug therapy/prevention & control; Humans; Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use; Infant; Intestine, Small/*transplantation; Liver Failure/*etiology/surgery; Organ Transplantation/*adverse effects/methods/physiology/trends; Parenteral Nutrition, Total/adverse effects; Patient Selection; Sepsis/complications/prevention & control
ISSN:
1522-8037 (Print); 1522-8037 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorQuigley, E Men_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:11:24Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:11:24Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:11:24Z-
dc.identifier.citationCurr Gastroenterol Rep. 2001 Oct;3(5):408-11.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1522-8037 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1522-8037 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid11560798en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/209068-
dc.description.abstractThe past few years have witnessed a considerable shift in the clinical status of intestinal transplantation. A great deal of experience has been gained at the most active centers, and results comparable with those reported at a similar stage in the development of other solid-organ graft programs are now being achieved by these highly proficient transplant teams. Rejection and its inevitable associate, sepsis, remain ubiquitous, and new immunosuppressant regimes are urgently needed; some may already be on the near horizon. The recent success of isolated intestinal grafts, together with the mortality and morbidity attendant upon the development of advanced liver disease related to total parenteral nutrition, has prompted the bold proposal that patients at risk for this complication should be identified and should receive isolated small bowel grafts before the onset of end-stage hepatic failure. The very fact that such a suggestion has begun to emerge reflects real progress in this challenging field.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshChilden_GB
dc.subject.meshGraft Rejection/complications/drug therapy/prevention & controlen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshImmunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic useen_GB
dc.subject.meshInfanten_GB
dc.subject.meshIntestine, Small/*transplantationen_GB
dc.subject.meshLiver Failure/*etiology/surgeryen_GB
dc.subject.meshOrgan Transplantation/*adverse effects/methods/physiology/trendsen_GB
dc.subject.meshParenteral Nutrition, Total/adverse effectsen_GB
dc.subject.meshPatient Selectionen_GB
dc.subject.meshSepsis/complications/prevention & controlen_GB
dc.titleSmall intestinal transplantation.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Cork University Hospital, Central Sciences Building,, Cork, Ireland. e.quigley@ucc.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalCurrent gastroenterology reportsen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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