Protein kinase C isozymes, novel phorbol ester receptors and cancer chemotherapy.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209067
Title:
Protein kinase C isozymes, novel phorbol ester receptors and cancer chemotherapy.
Authors:
Barry, O P; Kazanietz, M G
Affiliation:
Cork Cancer Research Center and Department of Medicine, Clinical Science, Building, Cork University Hospital, Wilton Road, Cork, Ireland., goggieie@yahoo.com
Citation:
Curr Pharm Des. 2001 Nov;7(17):1725-44.
Journal:
Current pharmaceutical design
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209067
PubMed ID:
11562308
Abstract:
Recent years have seen extensive growth in the understanding of the role(s) of the various PKC isozymes and novel receptors for the phorbol ester tumor promoters. The PKC family of serine-threonine kinases is an important regulator of signaling cascades that control cell proliferation and death, and therefore represent targets for cancer therapy. While past interests have focused on PKC-selective inhibitors, more recently, intensive research has been underway for selective activators and inhibitors for each individual PKC isozyme. In the past few years a large number of PKC activators and inhibitors with potential as anticancer agents have been developed. A number of these compounds are already in Phase II clinical testing. As a new generation of cancer chemotherapeutic agents are designed, developed and put through a series of rigorous clinical trials, we can anticipate achieving exquisite control over PKC-mediated regulatory pathways, leading ultimately to a greater understanding of different cancers.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Animals; Antineoplastic Agents/chemistry/*metabolism; Binding Sites; *Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins; Drug Design; Humans; Phorbols/chemistry/*metabolism; Protein Kinase C/antagonists & inhibitors/*chemistry/*metabolism/physiology; Receptors, Drug/chemistry/*metabolism
ISSN:
1381-6128 (Print); 1381-6128 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBarry, O Pen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKazanietz, M Gen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:11:23Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:11:23Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:11:23Z-
dc.identifier.citationCurr Pharm Des. 2001 Nov;7(17):1725-44.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1381-6128 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1381-6128 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid11562308en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/209067-
dc.description.abstractRecent years have seen extensive growth in the understanding of the role(s) of the various PKC isozymes and novel receptors for the phorbol ester tumor promoters. The PKC family of serine-threonine kinases is an important regulator of signaling cascades that control cell proliferation and death, and therefore represent targets for cancer therapy. While past interests have focused on PKC-selective inhibitors, more recently, intensive research has been underway for selective activators and inhibitors for each individual PKC isozyme. In the past few years a large number of PKC activators and inhibitors with potential as anticancer agents have been developed. A number of these compounds are already in Phase II clinical testing. As a new generation of cancer chemotherapeutic agents are designed, developed and put through a series of rigorous clinical trials, we can anticipate achieving exquisite control over PKC-mediated regulatory pathways, leading ultimately to a greater understanding of different cancers.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_GB
dc.subject.meshAntineoplastic Agents/chemistry/*metabolismen_GB
dc.subject.meshBinding Sitesen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Caenorhabditis elegans Proteinsen_GB
dc.subject.meshDrug Designen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshPhorbols/chemistry/*metabolismen_GB
dc.subject.meshProtein Kinase C/antagonists & inhibitors/*chemistry/*metabolism/physiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshReceptors, Drug/chemistry/*metabolismen_GB
dc.titleProtein kinase C isozymes, novel phorbol ester receptors and cancer chemotherapy.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentCork Cancer Research Center and Department of Medicine, Clinical Science, Building, Cork University Hospital, Wilton Road, Cork, Ireland., goggieie@yahoo.comen_GB
dc.identifier.journalCurrent pharmaceutical designen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-
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