Synchronous high-risk melanoma and lymphoid neoplasia.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209064
Title:
Synchronous high-risk melanoma and lymphoid neoplasia.
Authors:
Cahill, R A; McGreal, G; Neary, P; Redmond, H P
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, N. U. I., Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland.
Citation:
Melanoma Res. 2001 Oct;11(5):517-22.
Journal:
Melanoma research
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209064
PubMed ID:
11595890
Abstract:
Large population-based studies have shown a significant association between melanoma and lymphoid neoplasia, particularly non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), that is independent of any treatment received for the initial tumour. This study examines the presentation, diagnosis, treatment and progress of three patients who developed advanced melanoma concurrently with a lymphoid neoplasm (one NHL, two CLLs), in order to illustrate their association, discuss common aetiological factors and examine possible therapeutic options. As it is the melanoma rather than the lymphoid neoplasm that represents the bigger threat to overall survival, initial treatment should be targeted towards this cancer. However, because of the interplay between the diseases and the possible side-effects of the various treatments, the choice of adjuvant therapy requires careful consideration. Immunosuppression associated with chemotherapy may permit a more aggressive course for the melanoma, while locoregional radiotherapy is contraindicated following lymph node dissections. As immunotherapy is of benefit in the treatment of melanoma and has also been recently shown to be effective in the management of lymphoid neoplasia, we instituted interferon-alpha as adjuvant therapy for these patients, thereby utilizing a single agent to treat the dual pathologies. The three patients have now been followed-up for 6 months without evidence of disease recurrence or progression.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Chemotherapy, Adjuvant/methods; Disease Susceptibility; Environment; Female; Humans; Incidence; Interferon-alpha/therapeutic use; *Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell/genetics/immunology/pathology/therapy; Lymph Nodes/pathology; *Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin/genetics/immunology/pathology/therapy; Male; *Melanoma/genetics/immunology/pathology/therapy; Middle Aged; *Neoplasms, Multiple Primary/genetics/immunology/pathology/therapy; Radiotherapy/contraindications; Risk Factors; Ultraviolet Rays/adverse effects
ISSN:
0960-8931 (Print); 0960-8931 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCahill, R Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcGreal, Gen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNeary, Pen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRedmond, H Pen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:11:18Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:11:18Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:11:18Z-
dc.identifier.citationMelanoma Res. 2001 Oct;11(5):517-22.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0960-8931 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0960-8931 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid11595890en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/209064-
dc.description.abstractLarge population-based studies have shown a significant association between melanoma and lymphoid neoplasia, particularly non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), that is independent of any treatment received for the initial tumour. This study examines the presentation, diagnosis, treatment and progress of three patients who developed advanced melanoma concurrently with a lymphoid neoplasm (one NHL, two CLLs), in order to illustrate their association, discuss common aetiological factors and examine possible therapeutic options. As it is the melanoma rather than the lymphoid neoplasm that represents the bigger threat to overall survival, initial treatment should be targeted towards this cancer. However, because of the interplay between the diseases and the possible side-effects of the various treatments, the choice of adjuvant therapy requires careful consideration. Immunosuppression associated with chemotherapy may permit a more aggressive course for the melanoma, while locoregional radiotherapy is contraindicated following lymph node dissections. As immunotherapy is of benefit in the treatment of melanoma and has also been recently shown to be effective in the management of lymphoid neoplasia, we instituted interferon-alpha as adjuvant therapy for these patients, thereby utilizing a single agent to treat the dual pathologies. The three patients have now been followed-up for 6 months without evidence of disease recurrence or progression.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAgeden_GB
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen_GB
dc.subject.meshChemotherapy, Adjuvant/methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshDisease Susceptibilityen_GB
dc.subject.meshEnvironmenten_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen_GB
dc.subject.meshInterferon-alpha/therapeutic useen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell/genetics/immunology/pathology/therapyen_GB
dc.subject.meshLymph Nodes/pathologyen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin/genetics/immunology/pathology/therapyen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Melanoma/genetics/immunology/pathology/therapyen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Neoplasms, Multiple Primary/genetics/immunology/pathology/therapyen_GB
dc.subject.meshRadiotherapy/contraindicationsen_GB
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_GB
dc.subject.meshUltraviolet Rays/adverse effectsen_GB
dc.titleSynchronous high-risk melanoma and lymphoid neoplasia.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery, N. U. I., Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalMelanoma researchen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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