What a signature adds to the consent process.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209063
Title:
What a signature adds to the consent process.
Authors:
Neary, Peter; Cahill, Ronan A; Kirwan, W O; Kiely, E; Redmond, H P
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland.
Citation:
Surg Endosc. 2008 Dec;22(12):2698-704. Epub 2008 Apr 10.
Journal:
Surgical endoscopy
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209063
DOI:
10.1007/s00464-008-9874-3
PubMed ID:
18401652
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: "Consent is a process by which a patient is informed and becomes a participant in decisions regarding their medical management." It is argued, however, that providing a signature to a form adds little to the quality of this process. METHODS: Views regarding the consent ritual of nonselected patients undergoing endoscopy (cystoscopy or sigmoidoscopy) were prospectively studied together with those of the attending staff. Patient volunteers were randomly assigned to one of two groups and given verbal explanation before the procedure, either alone (group A) or with a request to sign a form in addition (group B). A standardized questionnaire regarding preferences then was applied. RESULTS: A total of 37 patients (22 men) were studied along with seven staff members. Most surveyed felt that signing a consent form helped to empower the patient (group A, 84%; group B, 83%; staff, 100%). Although the patients mainly believed that it functioned primarily to protect the hospital and doctor (group A, 89%; group B, 67%), only one patient (3% of total) felt that such a formality undermined the patient-doctor relationship. Most staff members favored signing a form (86%). The majority of patients either favored it (group A, 47%; group B, 78%) or expressed no strong preference (group A, 32%; group B, 11%). Interestingly, more women than men preferred signing (73 vs. 55%; p = 0.25), perhaps because more women believed that it functioned to preserve autonomy (93 vs. 77% of men). Age was no particular determinant of perspective. CONCLUSION: Although it may be viewed as primarily serving to protect the doctor and hospital, the formal process of signing written consent forms appeals to patients and staff.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adult; Aged; Cohort Studies; Culture; Cystoscopy/*psychology; Female; Humans; Informed Consent/legislation & jurisprudence/*psychology; Male; Middle Aged; Nurses/psychology; Organizational Policy; Patient Education as Topic; Patient Satisfaction; Personal Autonomy; Physician-Patient Relations; Physicians/psychology; Prospective Studies; Questionnaires; Sigmoidoscopy/*psychology
ISSN:
1432-2218 (Electronic); 0930-2794 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNeary, Peteren_GB
dc.contributor.authorCahill, Ronan Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKirwan, W Oen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKiely, Een_GB
dc.contributor.authorRedmond, H Pen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:11:16Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:11:16Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:11:16Z-
dc.identifier.citationSurg Endosc. 2008 Dec;22(12):2698-704. Epub 2008 Apr 10.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1432-2218 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0930-2794 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid18401652en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00464-008-9874-3en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/209063-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: "Consent is a process by which a patient is informed and becomes a participant in decisions regarding their medical management." It is argued, however, that providing a signature to a form adds little to the quality of this process. METHODS: Views regarding the consent ritual of nonselected patients undergoing endoscopy (cystoscopy or sigmoidoscopy) were prospectively studied together with those of the attending staff. Patient volunteers were randomly assigned to one of two groups and given verbal explanation before the procedure, either alone (group A) or with a request to sign a form in addition (group B). A standardized questionnaire regarding preferences then was applied. RESULTS: A total of 37 patients (22 men) were studied along with seven staff members. Most surveyed felt that signing a consent form helped to empower the patient (group A, 84%; group B, 83%; staff, 100%). Although the patients mainly believed that it functioned primarily to protect the hospital and doctor (group A, 89%; group B, 67%), only one patient (3% of total) felt that such a formality undermined the patient-doctor relationship. Most staff members favored signing a form (86%). The majority of patients either favored it (group A, 47%; group B, 78%) or expressed no strong preference (group A, 32%; group B, 11%). Interestingly, more women than men preferred signing (73 vs. 55%; p = 0.25), perhaps because more women believed that it functioned to preserve autonomy (93 vs. 77% of men). Age was no particular determinant of perspective. CONCLUSION: Although it may be viewed as primarily serving to protect the doctor and hospital, the formal process of signing written consent forms appeals to patients and staff.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshAgeden_GB
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshCultureen_GB
dc.subject.meshCystoscopy/*psychologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshInformed Consent/legislation & jurisprudence/*psychologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshNurses/psychologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshOrganizational Policyen_GB
dc.subject.meshPatient Education as Topicen_GB
dc.subject.meshPatient Satisfactionen_GB
dc.subject.meshPersonal Autonomyen_GB
dc.subject.meshPhysician-Patient Relationsen_GB
dc.subject.meshPhysicians/psychologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_GB
dc.subject.meshSigmoidoscopy/*psychologyen_GB
dc.titleWhat a signature adds to the consent process.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalSurgical endoscopyen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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