The natural history of hepatitis C virus infection.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209060
Title:
The natural history of hepatitis C virus infection.
Authors:
Kenny-Walsh, E
Affiliation:
Department of Hepatology, Cork University Hospital and University College Cork,, Cork, Ireland.
Citation:
Clin Liver Dis. 2001 Nov;5(4):969-77.
Journal:
Clinics in liver disease
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209060
PubMed ID:
11685804
Abstract:
The natural history of HCV infection remains ill-defined. The knowledge accumulated on the progression of HCV to date is important, however. It is now abundantly clear that the progression of disease is generally slow, and the development of cirrhosis and its complications is a possibility, not a probability as hitherto thought. Predicting the outcome remains a quandary for clinicians. Ultimately it will be possible to define the natural history of hepatitis C infection through a combination of research in the fields of virology, immunology, and molecular biology and by monitoring the biochemical and histologic progress of the disease. Only then will it be possible to intervene appropriately and develop new therapies to prevent the progression to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Hepacivirus/genetics/pathogenicity; Hepatitis C/diagnosis/*etiology/transmission; Hepatitis C, Chronic/etiology; Humans; Risk Factors
ISSN:
1089-3261 (Print); 1089-3261 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKenny-Walsh, Een_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:11:11Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:11:11Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:11:11Z-
dc.identifier.citationClin Liver Dis. 2001 Nov;5(4):969-77.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1089-3261 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1089-3261 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid11685804en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/209060-
dc.description.abstractThe natural history of HCV infection remains ill-defined. The knowledge accumulated on the progression of HCV to date is important, however. It is now abundantly clear that the progression of disease is generally slow, and the development of cirrhosis and its complications is a possibility, not a probability as hitherto thought. Predicting the outcome remains a quandary for clinicians. Ultimately it will be possible to define the natural history of hepatitis C infection through a combination of research in the fields of virology, immunology, and molecular biology and by monitoring the biochemical and histologic progress of the disease. Only then will it be possible to intervene appropriately and develop new therapies to prevent the progression to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshHepacivirus/genetics/pathogenicityen_GB
dc.subject.meshHepatitis C/diagnosis/*etiology/transmissionen_GB
dc.subject.meshHepatitis C, Chronic/etiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_GB
dc.titleThe natural history of hepatitis C virus infection.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Hepatology, Cork University Hospital and University College Cork,, Cork, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalClinics in liver diseaseen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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