New onset seizures in the elderly: aetiology and prognosis.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209043
Title:
New onset seizures in the elderly: aetiology and prognosis.
Authors:
Timmons, S; Sweeney, B; Hyland, M; O'Mahony, D; Twomey, C
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Ireland., suzannea@eircom.net
Citation:
Ir Med J. 2002 Feb;95(2):47-9.
Journal:
Irish medical journal
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209043
PubMed ID:
11989947
Abstract:
Late onset epilepsy is increasing in incidence. These patients often have significant underlying morbidity. This retrospective study in a tertiary referral centre identified 68 patients aged 65 years or older, with new onset seizures over a four-year period. 81% of patients (n = 55) were followed up at an average of 2.7 years post diagnosis. 38% of patients had evidence of cerebrovascular disease (CT visualised focal infarction, haemorrhage or small vessel ischaemia in 32%, clinical diagnosis with normal CT brain in 6%). No patient was found to have a space-occupying lesion. Of the 55 patients followed up, 45% of these had died at a mean age of 82 years old and 1.9 years post diagnosis (range 12 hours to 5 years). Three patients died as a direct result of seizures (trauma and sepsis). 14 patients died of clearly unrelated causes. Eight patients died from underlying vascular disease or Alzheimer's dementia. Patients who died during follow-up were on average 3.4 years older at the time of diagnosis than survivors (p< 0.05). Patients with atrial fibrillation at the time of diagnosis, had increased mortality (relative risk 2.53; 95% C.I. 1.19 - 5.36), but they were older than those without atrial fibrillation. At the time of follow up, 92% of those taking anti-convulsants were maintained seizure free on anticonvulsant monotherapy.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Age Factors; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use; Comorbidity; Epilepsy/*epidemiology/etiology/mortality/prevention & control; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Incidence; Prognosis; Retrospective Studies; Time Factors
ISSN:
0332-3102 (Print); 0332-3102 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTimmons, Sen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSweeney, Ben_GB
dc.contributor.authorHyland, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Mahony, Den_GB
dc.contributor.authorTwomey, Cen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:10:43Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:10:43Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:10:43Z-
dc.identifier.citationIr Med J. 2002 Feb;95(2):47-9.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid11989947en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/209043-
dc.description.abstractLate onset epilepsy is increasing in incidence. These patients often have significant underlying morbidity. This retrospective study in a tertiary referral centre identified 68 patients aged 65 years or older, with new onset seizures over a four-year period. 81% of patients (n = 55) were followed up at an average of 2.7 years post diagnosis. 38% of patients had evidence of cerebrovascular disease (CT visualised focal infarction, haemorrhage or small vessel ischaemia in 32%, clinical diagnosis with normal CT brain in 6%). No patient was found to have a space-occupying lesion. Of the 55 patients followed up, 45% of these had died at a mean age of 82 years old and 1.9 years post diagnosis (range 12 hours to 5 years). Three patients died as a direct result of seizures (trauma and sepsis). 14 patients died of clearly unrelated causes. Eight patients died from underlying vascular disease or Alzheimer's dementia. Patients who died during follow-up were on average 3.4 years older at the time of diagnosis than survivors (p< 0.05). Patients with atrial fibrillation at the time of diagnosis, had increased mortality (relative risk 2.53; 95% C.I. 1.19 - 5.36), but they were older than those without atrial fibrillation. At the time of follow up, 92% of those taking anti-convulsants were maintained seizure free on anticonvulsant monotherapy.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAge Factorsen_GB
dc.subject.meshAgeden_GB
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnticonvulsants/therapeutic useen_GB
dc.subject.meshComorbidityen_GB
dc.subject.meshEpilepsy/*epidemiology/etiology/mortality/prevention & controlen_GB
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen_GB
dc.subject.meshPrognosisen_GB
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_GB
dc.titleNew onset seizures in the elderly: aetiology and prognosis.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Neurology, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Ireland., suzannea@eircom.neten_GB
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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