Antiseptic wick: does it reduce the incidence of wound infection following appendectomy?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209035
Title:
Antiseptic wick: does it reduce the incidence of wound infection following appendectomy?
Authors:
McGreal, Gerald T; Joy, Aislinn; Manning, Brian; Kelly, John L; O'Donnell, Joseph A; Kirwan, W William O; Redmond, H Paul
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, Professorial Unit, Cork University Hospital, Cork,, Ireland.
Citation:
World J Surg. 2002 May;26(5):631-4. Epub 2002 Mar 18.
Journal:
World journal of surgery
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209035
DOI:
10.1007/s00268-001-0281-3
PubMed ID:
12098059
Abstract:
The role of prophylactic antibiotics is well established for contaminated wounds, but the use of antiseptic wound wicks is controversial. The aim of this work was to study the potential use of wound wicks to reduce the rate of infection following appendectomy. This prospective randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted at a university hospital in the department of surgery. The subjects were patients undergoing appendectomy for definite acute appendicitis. They were randomized by computer to primary subcuticular wound closure or use of an antiseptic wound wick. For the latter, ribbon gauze soaked in povidone-iodine was placed between interrupted nylon skin sutures. Wicks were soaked daily and removed on the fourth postoperative day. All patients received antibiotic prophylaxis. They were reviewed while in hospital and 4 weeks following operation for evidence of wound infection. The main outcome measures were wound infection, wound discomfort, and cosmetic result. The overall wound infection rate was 8.6% (15/174). In patients with wound wicks it was 11.6% (10/86) compared to 5.6% (5/88) in those whose wounds were closed by subcuticular sutures (p = NS). We concluded that the use of wound wicks was not associated with decreased wound infection rates following appendectomy. Subcuticular closure is therefore appropriate in view of its greater convenience and safety.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adolescent; Adult; Anti-Infective Agents, Local/*therapeutic use; Antibiotic Prophylaxis; Appendectomy/*methods; Appendicitis/*surgery; Child; Child, Preschool; Female; Humans; Length of Stay; Male; Middle Aged; Postoperative Period; Povidone-Iodine/*therapeutic use; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Surgical Wound Infection/*prevention & control; *Suture Techniques; Treatment Outcome
ISSN:
0364-2313 (Print); 0364-2313 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMcGreal, Gerald Ten_GB
dc.contributor.authorJoy, Aislinnen_GB
dc.contributor.authorManning, Brianen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKelly, John Len_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Donnell, Joseph Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKirwan, W William Oen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRedmond, H Paulen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:10:30Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:10:30Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:10:30Z-
dc.identifier.citationWorld J Surg. 2002 May;26(5):631-4. Epub 2002 Mar 18.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0364-2313 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0364-2313 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid12098059en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00268-001-0281-3en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/209035-
dc.description.abstractThe role of prophylactic antibiotics is well established for contaminated wounds, but the use of antiseptic wound wicks is controversial. The aim of this work was to study the potential use of wound wicks to reduce the rate of infection following appendectomy. This prospective randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted at a university hospital in the department of surgery. The subjects were patients undergoing appendectomy for definite acute appendicitis. They were randomized by computer to primary subcuticular wound closure or use of an antiseptic wound wick. For the latter, ribbon gauze soaked in povidone-iodine was placed between interrupted nylon skin sutures. Wicks were soaked daily and removed on the fourth postoperative day. All patients received antibiotic prophylaxis. They were reviewed while in hospital and 4 weeks following operation for evidence of wound infection. The main outcome measures were wound infection, wound discomfort, and cosmetic result. The overall wound infection rate was 8.6% (15/174). In patients with wound wicks it was 11.6% (10/86) compared to 5.6% (5/88) in those whose wounds were closed by subcuticular sutures (p = NS). We concluded that the use of wound wicks was not associated with decreased wound infection rates following appendectomy. Subcuticular closure is therefore appropriate in view of its greater convenience and safety.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshAnti-Infective Agents, Local/*therapeutic useen_GB
dc.subject.meshAntibiotic Prophylaxisen_GB
dc.subject.meshAppendectomy/*methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshAppendicitis/*surgeryen_GB
dc.subject.meshChilden_GB
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshLength of Stayen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshPostoperative Perioden_GB
dc.subject.meshPovidone-Iodine/*therapeutic useen_GB
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_GB
dc.subject.meshSurgical Wound Infection/*prevention & controlen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Suture Techniquesen_GB
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_GB
dc.titleAntiseptic wick: does it reduce the incidence of wound infection following appendectomy?en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery, Professorial Unit, Cork University Hospital, Cork,, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalWorld journal of surgeryen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-
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