Aging and intestinal motility: a review of factors that affect intestinal motility in the aged.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209030
Title:
Aging and intestinal motility: a review of factors that affect intestinal motility in the aged.
Authors:
O'Mahony, Denis; O'Leary, Paula; Quigley, Eamonn M M
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, Clinical Sciences Building, Cork University Hospital,, Cork, Ireland.
Citation:
Drugs Aging. 2002;19(7):515-27.
Journal:
Drugs & aging
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209030
PubMed ID:
12182688
Abstract:
Normal aging is associated with significant changes in the function of most organs and tissues. In this regard, the gastrointestinal tract is no exception. The purpose of this review is to detail the important age-related changes in motor function of the various parts of the gastrointestinal tract and to highlight some of the important motility changes that may occur, either in relation to common age-related disorders, or as a result of certain drugs commonly prescribed in the aged. A major confounding factor in the interpretation of motor phenomena throughout the gastrointestinal tract in this age group is the frequent coexistence of neurological, endocrinological and other disease states, which may be independently associated with dysmotility. Overall, current data are insufficient to implicate normal aging as a cause of dysmotility in the elderly. Normal aging is associated with various changes in gastrointestinal motility, but the clinical significance of such changes remains unclear. More important is the impact of various age-related diseases on gastrointestinal motility in the elderly: for example, long-standing diabetes mellitus may reduce gastric emptying in up to 50% of patients; depression significantly prolongs whole-gut transit time; hypothyroidism may prolong oro-caecal transit time; and chronic renal failure is associated with impaired gastric emptying. In addition, various, frequently used drugs in the elderly cause disordered gastrointestinal motility. These drugs include anticholinergics, especially antidepressants with an anticholinergic effect, opioid analgesics and calcium antagonists.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Aged; Aging/*physiology; Animals; Gastrointestinal Diseases/chemically induced/etiology/*physiopathology; Gastrointestinal Motility/*physiology; Humans; Iatrogenic Disease
ISSN:
1170-229X (Print); 1170-229X (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Mahony, Denisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Leary, Paulaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorQuigley, Eamonn M Men_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:10:22Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:10:22Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:10:22Z-
dc.identifier.citationDrugs Aging. 2002;19(7):515-27.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1170-229X (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1170-229X (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid12182688en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/209030-
dc.description.abstractNormal aging is associated with significant changes in the function of most organs and tissues. In this regard, the gastrointestinal tract is no exception. The purpose of this review is to detail the important age-related changes in motor function of the various parts of the gastrointestinal tract and to highlight some of the important motility changes that may occur, either in relation to common age-related disorders, or as a result of certain drugs commonly prescribed in the aged. A major confounding factor in the interpretation of motor phenomena throughout the gastrointestinal tract in this age group is the frequent coexistence of neurological, endocrinological and other disease states, which may be independently associated with dysmotility. Overall, current data are insufficient to implicate normal aging as a cause of dysmotility in the elderly. Normal aging is associated with various changes in gastrointestinal motility, but the clinical significance of such changes remains unclear. More important is the impact of various age-related diseases on gastrointestinal motility in the elderly: for example, long-standing diabetes mellitus may reduce gastric emptying in up to 50% of patients; depression significantly prolongs whole-gut transit time; hypothyroidism may prolong oro-caecal transit time; and chronic renal failure is associated with impaired gastric emptying. In addition, various, frequently used drugs in the elderly cause disordered gastrointestinal motility. These drugs include anticholinergics, especially antidepressants with an anticholinergic effect, opioid analgesics and calcium antagonists.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAgeden_GB
dc.subject.meshAging/*physiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_GB
dc.subject.meshGastrointestinal Diseases/chemically induced/etiology/*physiopathologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshGastrointestinal Motility/*physiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIatrogenic Diseaseen_GB
dc.titleAging and intestinal motility: a review of factors that affect intestinal motility in the aged.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Clinical Sciences Building, Cork University Hospital,, Cork, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalDrugs & agingen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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