Trends in antimicrobial susceptibility among isolates of Campylobacter species in Ireland and the emergence of resistance to ciprofloxacin.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209020
Title:
Trends in antimicrobial susceptibility among isolates of Campylobacter species in Ireland and the emergence of resistance to ciprofloxacin.
Authors:
Lucey, B; Cryan, B; O'Halloran, F; Wall, P G; Buckley, T; Fanning, S
Affiliation:
Department of Medical Microbiology, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Ireland.
Citation:
Vet Rec. 2002 Sep 14;151(11):317-20.
Journal:
The Veterinary record
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209020
PubMed ID:
12356234
Abstract:
Measurements were made of the susceptibility to six commonly prescribed antibiotics, including erythromycin, tetracycline and ciprofloxacin, of 130 isolates of Campylobacterjejuni and 15 isolates of Campylobacter coli cultured from human and poultry sources during 2000. The results were compared with the results from a collection of strains isolated between 1996 and 1998. The levels of resistance to erythromycin remained low, 2 per cent and 4.4 per cent for the human and poultry isolates, respectively. Resistance to tetracycline had increased to 31 per cent and 24.4 per cent from 13.9 per cent and 18.8 per cent for the human and poultry isolates, respectively. However, the resistance to ciprofloxacin of the strains isolated during 2000 had increased to 30 per cent, whereas between 1996 and 1998 there had been no resistance to this agent among human isolates, and only 3.1 per cent resistance among poultry isolates. The molecular basis for this resistance has been shown to be the result of a single amino acid substitution, Thr-86-Ile, in the gyrA subunit of DNA gyrase in Cjejuni. A subset of 59 isolates was tested by molecular methods and all of the 25 phenotypically resistant isolates possessed this substitution. None of the human isolates had been treated with ciprofloxacin before their laboratory isolation.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Animals; Anti-Infective Agents/*pharmacology; Campylobacter coli/*drug effects/isolation & purification; Campylobacter jejuni/*drug effects/genetics/isolation & purification; Ciprofloxacin/*pharmacology; Drug Resistance/genetics; Humans; Polymerase Chain Reaction; Poultry
ISSN:
0042-4900 (Print); 0042-4900 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLucey, Ben_GB
dc.contributor.authorCryan, Ben_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Halloran, Fen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWall, P Gen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBuckley, Ten_GB
dc.contributor.authorFanning, Sen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:10:06Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:10:06Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:10:06Z-
dc.identifier.citationVet Rec. 2002 Sep 14;151(11):317-20.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0042-4900 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0042-4900 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid12356234en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/209020-
dc.description.abstractMeasurements were made of the susceptibility to six commonly prescribed antibiotics, including erythromycin, tetracycline and ciprofloxacin, of 130 isolates of Campylobacterjejuni and 15 isolates of Campylobacter coli cultured from human and poultry sources during 2000. The results were compared with the results from a collection of strains isolated between 1996 and 1998. The levels of resistance to erythromycin remained low, 2 per cent and 4.4 per cent for the human and poultry isolates, respectively. Resistance to tetracycline had increased to 31 per cent and 24.4 per cent from 13.9 per cent and 18.8 per cent for the human and poultry isolates, respectively. However, the resistance to ciprofloxacin of the strains isolated during 2000 had increased to 30 per cent, whereas between 1996 and 1998 there had been no resistance to this agent among human isolates, and only 3.1 per cent resistance among poultry isolates. The molecular basis for this resistance has been shown to be the result of a single amino acid substitution, Thr-86-Ile, in the gyrA subunit of DNA gyrase in Cjejuni. A subset of 59 isolates was tested by molecular methods and all of the 25 phenotypically resistant isolates possessed this substitution. None of the human isolates had been treated with ciprofloxacin before their laboratory isolation.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnti-Infective Agents/*pharmacologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshCampylobacter coli/*drug effects/isolation & purificationen_GB
dc.subject.meshCampylobacter jejuni/*drug effects/genetics/isolation & purificationen_GB
dc.subject.meshCiprofloxacin/*pharmacologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshDrug Resistance/geneticsen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshPolymerase Chain Reactionen_GB
dc.subject.meshPoultryen_GB
dc.titleTrends in antimicrobial susceptibility among isolates of Campylobacter species in Ireland and the emergence of resistance to ciprofloxacin.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medical Microbiology, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalThe Veterinary recorden_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-
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