Determinants of learning to perform spinal anaesthesia: a pilot study.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209007
Title:
Determinants of learning to perform spinal anaesthesia: a pilot study.
Authors:
Kulcsar, Z; Aboulafia, A; Hall, T; Shorten, G D
Affiliation:
Cork University Hospital, Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, , Cork, Galway, Ireland. zsuzsanna.kulcsar@gmail.com
Citation:
Eur J Anaesthesiol. 2008 Dec;25(12):1026-31. Epub 2008 Jun 5.
Journal:
European journal of anaesthesiology
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/209007
DOI:
10.1017/S0265021508004535
PubMed ID:
18533064
Abstract:
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: This study examined attitudes and views held by stakeholders regarding their experience of training in spinal anaesthesia. The aim was to identify key factors related to learning and teaching processes which were perceived to influence the acquisition of competence in spinal anaesthesia. METHODS: The study was carried out at a busy acute tertiary referral teaching hospital over a period of 1 yr. It applied a qualitative research approach in three phases, namely (i) completion of preliminary questionnaires, (ii) completion of focused questionnaires and (iii) focus group discussions. RESULTS: Five factors were perceived to be critical 'determinants of learning': (i) the existence of a formal, structured training programme; (ii) time constraints/theatre efficiency; (iii) trainer-trainee interaction; (iv) patient safety/trainee/trainer stressors; and (v) visualization of the anatomy and procedure. CONCLUSION: The study highlighted the need for a formal and structured training programme in spinal anaesthesia, through which many of the undesirable and discouraging factors (such as stress, adverse trainer-trainee interaction and time constraints) identified in the study could be minimized. Further studies are needed to validate the results in other hospital settings, as well as to define the relative importance of each of the proposed determinants and their interrelationships.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
*Anesthesia, Spinal; Anesthesiology/*education; Clinical Competence/standards; Focus Groups/methods; Hospitals, Teaching; Humans; Ireland; *Learning; Pilot Projects; Program Evaluation/methods; *Questionnaires; Safety Management; Teaching/*standards
ISSN:
1365-2346 (Electronic); 0265-0215 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKulcsar, Zen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAboulafia, Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHall, Ten_GB
dc.contributor.authorShorten, G Den_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:09:45Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:09:45Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:09:45Z-
dc.identifier.citationEur J Anaesthesiol. 2008 Dec;25(12):1026-31. Epub 2008 Jun 5.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1365-2346 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0265-0215 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid18533064en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0265021508004535en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/209007-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: This study examined attitudes and views held by stakeholders regarding their experience of training in spinal anaesthesia. The aim was to identify key factors related to learning and teaching processes which were perceived to influence the acquisition of competence in spinal anaesthesia. METHODS: The study was carried out at a busy acute tertiary referral teaching hospital over a period of 1 yr. It applied a qualitative research approach in three phases, namely (i) completion of preliminary questionnaires, (ii) completion of focused questionnaires and (iii) focus group discussions. RESULTS: Five factors were perceived to be critical 'determinants of learning': (i) the existence of a formal, structured training programme; (ii) time constraints/theatre efficiency; (iii) trainer-trainee interaction; (iv) patient safety/trainee/trainer stressors; and (v) visualization of the anatomy and procedure. CONCLUSION: The study highlighted the need for a formal and structured training programme in spinal anaesthesia, through which many of the undesirable and discouraging factors (such as stress, adverse trainer-trainee interaction and time constraints) identified in the study could be minimized. Further studies are needed to validate the results in other hospital settings, as well as to define the relative importance of each of the proposed determinants and their interrelationships.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Anesthesia, Spinalen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnesthesiology/*educationen_GB
dc.subject.meshClinical Competence/standardsen_GB
dc.subject.meshFocus Groups/methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshHospitals, Teachingen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIrelanden_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Learningen_GB
dc.subject.meshPilot Projectsen_GB
dc.subject.meshProgram Evaluation/methodsen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Questionnairesen_GB
dc.subject.meshSafety Managementen_GB
dc.subject.meshTeaching/*standardsen_GB
dc.titleDeterminants of learning to perform spinal anaesthesia: a pilot study.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentCork University Hospital, Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, , Cork, Galway, Ireland. zsuzsanna.kulcsar@gmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.journalEuropean journal of anaesthesiologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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