Early experience with titanium elastic nails in a trauma unit.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208980
Title:
Early experience with titanium elastic nails in a trauma unit.
Authors:
Shah, M H; Heffernan, G; McGuinness, A J
Affiliation:
Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland.
Citation:
Ir Med J. 2003 Jul-Aug;96(7):213-4.
Journal:
Irish medical journal
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208980
PubMed ID:
14518586
Abstract:
The Titanium Elastic Nail (TEN) offers a number of potential advantages over traditional ways of treating long bone fractures particularly in the paediatric population. These advantages include earlier mobilisation and shorter hospital stay and less risk of loss of fracture position. These advantages are most apparent and significant when treating femoral fractures in children where the length of hospital stay is reduced from several weeks to a typical period of 5 to 8 days. We have reviewed our early experience of using these implants over the past 2 years. Patients were assessed clinically and radiologically. 13 patients were treated using the TEN during this period. There were 2 femoral fractures, 4 humeral fractures, 1 tibial and 6 forearm fractures treated using the Titanium Elastic Nail. All fractures united during the study period. However 1 humeral fracture required a secondary bone grafting and plating for delayed union and 1 fracture lost position during follow-up. Insertion point pain was a problem in 4 patients but this resolved after nail removal in all. There was 1 superficial wound infection which resolved with antibiotics and 1 superficial wound infection of an open fracture wound which resolved following nail removal and antibiotics. There were no cases of deep infection. There were no limb length discrepancy or rotational or angular malalignment problems. Biomechanical principles and technical aspects of this type of fixation are discussed.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adult; *Bone Nails; Female; Femoral Fractures/*surgery; Fracture Fixation, Internal/*methods; Humans; Ireland; Male; Titanium; *Trauma Centers
ISSN:
0332-3102 (Print); 0332-3102 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorShah, M Hen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHeffernan, Gen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcGuinness, A Jen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:09:04Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:09:04Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:09:04Z-
dc.identifier.citationIr Med J. 2003 Jul-Aug;96(7):213-4.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid14518586en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/208980-
dc.description.abstractThe Titanium Elastic Nail (TEN) offers a number of potential advantages over traditional ways of treating long bone fractures particularly in the paediatric population. These advantages include earlier mobilisation and shorter hospital stay and less risk of loss of fracture position. These advantages are most apparent and significant when treating femoral fractures in children where the length of hospital stay is reduced from several weeks to a typical period of 5 to 8 days. We have reviewed our early experience of using these implants over the past 2 years. Patients were assessed clinically and radiologically. 13 patients were treated using the TEN during this period. There were 2 femoral fractures, 4 humeral fractures, 1 tibial and 6 forearm fractures treated using the Titanium Elastic Nail. All fractures united during the study period. However 1 humeral fracture required a secondary bone grafting and plating for delayed union and 1 fracture lost position during follow-up. Insertion point pain was a problem in 4 patients but this resolved after nail removal in all. There was 1 superficial wound infection which resolved with antibiotics and 1 superficial wound infection of an open fracture wound which resolved following nail removal and antibiotics. There were no cases of deep infection. There were no limb length discrepancy or rotational or angular malalignment problems. Biomechanical principles and technical aspects of this type of fixation are discussed.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Bone Nailsen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemoral Fractures/*surgeryen_GB
dc.subject.meshFracture Fixation, Internal/*methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIrelanden_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshTitaniumen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Trauma Centersen_GB
dc.titleEarly experience with titanium elastic nails in a trauma unit.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentCork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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