Are peripheral opioid antagonists the solution to opioid side effects?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208974
Title:
Are peripheral opioid antagonists the solution to opioid side effects?
Authors:
Bates, John J; Foss, Joseph F; Murphy, Damian B
Affiliation:
Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, Cork University Hospital, , Ireland. jbates@esatclear.ie
Citation:
Anesth Analg. 2004 Jan;98(1):116-22, table of contents.
Journal:
Anesthesia and analgesia
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208974
PubMed ID:
14693600
Abstract:
Opioid medication is the mainstay of therapy for severe acute and chronic pain. Unfortunately, the side effects of these medications can affect patient comfort and safety, thus limiting their proven therapeutic potential. Whereas the main analgesic effects of opioids are centrally mediated, many of the common side effects are mediated via peripheral receptors. Novel peripheral opioid antagonists have been recently introduced that can block the peripheral actions of opioids without affecting centrally mediated analgesia. We review the clinical and experimental evidence of their efficacy in ameliorating opioid side effects and consider what further information might be useful in defining their role. IMPLICATIONS: The major analgesic effects of opioid medication are mediated within the brain and spinal cord. Many of the side effects of opioids are caused by activation of receptors outside these areas. Recently developed peripherally restricted opioid antagonists have the ability to block many opioid side effects without affecting analgesia.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Analgesics, Opioid/*adverse effects; Humans; Narcotic Antagonists/adverse effects/*therapeutic use; Peripheral Nerves/drug effects
ISSN:
0003-2999 (Print); 0003-2999 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBates, John Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFoss, Joseph Fen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Damian Ben_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:08:55Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:08:55Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:08:55Z-
dc.identifier.citationAnesth Analg. 2004 Jan;98(1):116-22, table of contents.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0003-2999 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0003-2999 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid14693600en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/208974-
dc.description.abstractOpioid medication is the mainstay of therapy for severe acute and chronic pain. Unfortunately, the side effects of these medications can affect patient comfort and safety, thus limiting their proven therapeutic potential. Whereas the main analgesic effects of opioids are centrally mediated, many of the common side effects are mediated via peripheral receptors. Novel peripheral opioid antagonists have been recently introduced that can block the peripheral actions of opioids without affecting centrally mediated analgesia. We review the clinical and experimental evidence of their efficacy in ameliorating opioid side effects and consider what further information might be useful in defining their role. IMPLICATIONS: The major analgesic effects of opioid medication are mediated within the brain and spinal cord. Many of the side effects of opioids are caused by activation of receptors outside these areas. Recently developed peripherally restricted opioid antagonists have the ability to block many opioid side effects without affecting analgesia.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnalgesics, Opioid/*adverse effectsen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshNarcotic Antagonists/adverse effects/*therapeutic useen_GB
dc.subject.meshPeripheral Nerves/drug effectsen_GB
dc.titleAre peripheral opioid antagonists the solution to opioid side effects?en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, Cork University Hospital, , Ireland. jbates@esatclear.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalAnesthesia and analgesiaen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.