Airways obstruction in survivors of thoracoplasty: reversibility is greater in non-smokers.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208964
Title:
Airways obstruction in survivors of thoracoplasty: reversibility is greater in non-smokers.
Authors:
O'Connor, Terence M; O'Riordan, Deirdre M; Stack, Maria; Bredin, Charles P
Affiliation:
Department of Respiratory Medicine, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork,, Ireland. oconnotm@mcmaster.ca
Citation:
Respirology. 2004 Mar;9(1):130-3.
Journal:
Respirology (Carlton, Vic.)
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208964
DOI:
10.1111/j.1440-1843.2003.00519.x
PubMed ID:
14982615
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: Before the advent of antituberculous chemotherapy, thoracoplasty (TPL) was the definitive form of therapy for cavitary pulmonary tuberculosis. This study aimed to characterize the late functional sequelae of TPL, and to establish the degree of reversibility of any consequent airway obstruction. METHODOLOGY: Pulmonary function was studied in 21 long-term (mean 35 years) survivors of TPL between the years 1990-2001. RESULTS: A mixed obstructive/restrictive defect was found in this patient cohort. After inhalation of bronchodilator, marginal increases in FEV(1) and FVC and marginal decreases in FRC, RV and TLC were observed. Maximum mid-expiratory flow rate was severely reduced (28.8% of predicted), but reversibility after inhaled beta(2)-agonist was highest for this parameter of pulmonary function (mean 11%). Smokers had a higher RV (P = 0.04), suggesting hyperinflation, while non-smokers had a larger increase in FEV(1)/FVC ratio postbronchodilator (P = 0.004), suggesting more marked reversibility of airways obstruction in this group. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term survivors of TPL have an obstructive as well as a restrictive ventilatory defect. These patients have partial reversibility of the obstructive defect. The degree of reversibility found suggests that bronchodilator therapy may help these patients.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Aged; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Respiratory Function Tests; Smoking/*physiopathology; *Thoracoplasty; Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/*physiopathology/*surgery
ISSN:
1323-7799 (Print); 1323-7799 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Terence Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Riordan, Deirdre Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorStack, Mariaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBredin, Charles Pen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:08:39Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:08:39Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:08:39Z-
dc.identifier.citationRespirology. 2004 Mar;9(1):130-3.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1323-7799 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1323-7799 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid14982615en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1440-1843.2003.00519.xen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/208964-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Before the advent of antituberculous chemotherapy, thoracoplasty (TPL) was the definitive form of therapy for cavitary pulmonary tuberculosis. This study aimed to characterize the late functional sequelae of TPL, and to establish the degree of reversibility of any consequent airway obstruction. METHODOLOGY: Pulmonary function was studied in 21 long-term (mean 35 years) survivors of TPL between the years 1990-2001. RESULTS: A mixed obstructive/restrictive defect was found in this patient cohort. After inhalation of bronchodilator, marginal increases in FEV(1) and FVC and marginal decreases in FRC, RV and TLC were observed. Maximum mid-expiratory flow rate was severely reduced (28.8% of predicted), but reversibility after inhaled beta(2)-agonist was highest for this parameter of pulmonary function (mean 11%). Smokers had a higher RV (P = 0.04), suggesting hyperinflation, while non-smokers had a larger increase in FEV(1)/FVC ratio postbronchodilator (P = 0.004), suggesting more marked reversibility of airways obstruction in this group. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term survivors of TPL have an obstructive as well as a restrictive ventilatory defect. These patients have partial reversibility of the obstructive defect. The degree of reversibility found suggests that bronchodilator therapy may help these patients.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAgeden_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshRespiratory Function Testsen_GB
dc.subject.meshSmoking/*physiopathologyen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Thoracoplastyen_GB
dc.subject.meshTuberculosis, Pulmonary/*physiopathology/*surgeryen_GB
dc.titleAirways obstruction in survivors of thoracoplasty: reversibility is greater in non-smokers.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Respiratory Medicine, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork,, Ireland. oconnotm@mcmaster.caen_GB
dc.identifier.journalRespirology (Carlton, Vic.)en_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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