[Significance of Toll-like receptors in the pathophysiology of surgical sepsis].

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208938
Title:
[Significance of Toll-like receptors in the pathophysiology of surgical sepsis].
Authors:
Romics, Laszlo Jr; Coffey, John Calvin; Wang, Jiang Huai; Redmond, Henry Paul; Szabo, Gyongyi
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, Cork University Hospital, National University of Ireland, , Cork, Ireland. Laszlo.Romics@umassmed.edu
Citation:
Magy Seb. 2004 Aug;57(4):229-35.
Journal:
Magyar sebeszet
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208938
PubMed ID:
15570917
Abstract:
The discovery of Toll-like receptors has substantially changed our knowledge of pathogen recognition. 11 Toll-like receptors have so far been described in humans. These recognize distinct pathogen associated molecular patterns, as well as endogenous ligands and small molecular synthetic compounds. TLRs have a multifunctional role in pathogen-triggered immune responses and represent an important connection between the "innate" and "adaptive" immunity. The role of the TLRs in the recognition of pathogens renders them a key figure in the activation of the immune response during surgical sepsis. However, emerging evidence points to a fundamental role in tumorigenesis, transplantation, wound healing, atherogenesis and inflammatory bowel disease. The aim hence was to review experimental data pertaining to the activation of TLR signalling pathways in conditions associated with surgical sepsis. A systematic review of the literature was undertaken by searching the MEDLINE database for the period 1966-2004 without language restriction. The paper also analyses the possible therapeutic utilization of the TLR signalling pathways in surgical sepsis.
Language:
hun
MeSH:
Humans; Membrane Glycoproteins/*metabolism; Receptors, Cell Surface/*metabolism; Sepsis/etiology/*metabolism; *Signal Transduction; Surgical Wound Infection/*metabolism; Toll-Like Receptors
ISSN:
0025-0295 (Print); 0025-0295 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRomics, Laszlo Jren_GB
dc.contributor.authorCoffey, John Calvinen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWang, Jiang Huaien_GB
dc.contributor.authorRedmond, Henry Paulen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSzabo, Gyongyien_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:07:56Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:07:56Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:07:56Z-
dc.identifier.citationMagy Seb. 2004 Aug;57(4):229-35.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0025-0295 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0025-0295 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid15570917en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/208938-
dc.description.abstractThe discovery of Toll-like receptors has substantially changed our knowledge of pathogen recognition. 11 Toll-like receptors have so far been described in humans. These recognize distinct pathogen associated molecular patterns, as well as endogenous ligands and small molecular synthetic compounds. TLRs have a multifunctional role in pathogen-triggered immune responses and represent an important connection between the "innate" and "adaptive" immunity. The role of the TLRs in the recognition of pathogens renders them a key figure in the activation of the immune response during surgical sepsis. However, emerging evidence points to a fundamental role in tumorigenesis, transplantation, wound healing, atherogenesis and inflammatory bowel disease. The aim hence was to review experimental data pertaining to the activation of TLR signalling pathways in conditions associated with surgical sepsis. A systematic review of the literature was undertaken by searching the MEDLINE database for the period 1966-2004 without language restriction. The paper also analyses the possible therapeutic utilization of the TLR signalling pathways in surgical sepsis.en_GB
dc.language.isohunen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshMembrane Glycoproteins/*metabolismen_GB
dc.subject.meshReceptors, Cell Surface/*metabolismen_GB
dc.subject.meshSepsis/etiology/*metabolismen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Signal Transductionen_GB
dc.subject.meshSurgical Wound Infection/*metabolismen_GB
dc.subject.meshToll-Like Receptorsen_GB
dc.title[Significance of Toll-like receptors in the pathophysiology of surgical sepsis].en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery, Cork University Hospital, National University of Ireland, , Cork, Ireland. Laszlo.Romics@umassmed.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.journalMagyar sebeszeten_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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