Anaesthetic specialist registrars in Ireland: current teaching practices and perceptions of their role as undergraduate teachers.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208930
Title:
Anaesthetic specialist registrars in Ireland: current teaching practices and perceptions of their role as undergraduate teachers.
Authors:
Walsh, K; Ahern, S; Condon, E; O'Connor, M; O'Callaghan, S
Affiliation:
Cork University Hospital, Department of Anaesthetics, Intensive Care and Pain, Medicine, Wilton, Cork, Ireland. kenwalsh@ireland.com
Citation:
Eur J Anaesthesiol. 2004 Oct;21(10):824-8.
Journal:
European journal of anaesthesiology
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208930
PubMed ID:
15678739
Abstract:
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Teaching is an important responsibility of non-consultant hospital doctors. In Ireland, specialist registrars (SpRs) in anaesthesia are contractually obliged to teach medical students, other doctors and nurses. Both medical students and fellow non-consultant hospital doctors attribute between 30 and 40% of their knowledge gain to non-consultant hospital doctors. METHODS: We carried out a confidential telephone survey of anaesthetic SpRs in Ireland regarding their current teaching practices and the perceptions of their role as undergraduate teachers. All the SpRs currently working in clinical practice in Ireland were eligible. RESULTS: Fifty-five of the 79 (70%) SpRs responded to the questionnaire. Only 7 (12.7%) of the respondents said they had been well trained as a teacher. The majority of the respondents stated that they would attend a learning-to-teach course/workshop if one was available, and felt that such a course would improve their ability as a teacher. Only 8 (14.5%) agreed that adequate emphasis is placed on commitment to teaching in the assessment of SpRs, both by individual departments and by the College of Anaesthetists. Anaesthetic SpRs in Ireland spend a considerable amount of time each day teaching undergraduate medical students, the majority (68.9%) stated that they had inadequate time to prepare for teaching. CONCLUSION: The majority of the respondents stated that they enjoy teaching, feel that they play an important role in undergraduate teaching but have inadequate time to prepare for teaching. An adequate emphasis is not placed on their commitment to teaching.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adult; Anesthesiology/*education; Attitude of Health Personnel; Data Collection; Education, Medical, Undergraduate; Female; Humans; Ireland; Male; Medical Staff, Hospital; *Teaching
ISSN:
0265-0215 (Print); 0265-0215 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, Ken_GB
dc.contributor.authorAhern, Sen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCondon, Een_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Callaghan, Sen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:07:43Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:07:43Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:07:43Z-
dc.identifier.citationEur J Anaesthesiol. 2004 Oct;21(10):824-8.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0265-0215 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0265-0215 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid15678739en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/208930-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Teaching is an important responsibility of non-consultant hospital doctors. In Ireland, specialist registrars (SpRs) in anaesthesia are contractually obliged to teach medical students, other doctors and nurses. Both medical students and fellow non-consultant hospital doctors attribute between 30 and 40% of their knowledge gain to non-consultant hospital doctors. METHODS: We carried out a confidential telephone survey of anaesthetic SpRs in Ireland regarding their current teaching practices and the perceptions of their role as undergraduate teachers. All the SpRs currently working in clinical practice in Ireland were eligible. RESULTS: Fifty-five of the 79 (70%) SpRs responded to the questionnaire. Only 7 (12.7%) of the respondents said they had been well trained as a teacher. The majority of the respondents stated that they would attend a learning-to-teach course/workshop if one was available, and felt that such a course would improve their ability as a teacher. Only 8 (14.5%) agreed that adequate emphasis is placed on commitment to teaching in the assessment of SpRs, both by individual departments and by the College of Anaesthetists. Anaesthetic SpRs in Ireland spend a considerable amount of time each day teaching undergraduate medical students, the majority (68.9%) stated that they had inadequate time to prepare for teaching. CONCLUSION: The majority of the respondents stated that they enjoy teaching, feel that they play an important role in undergraduate teaching but have inadequate time to prepare for teaching. An adequate emphasis is not placed on their commitment to teaching.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshAnesthesiology/*educationen_GB
dc.subject.meshAttitude of Health Personnelen_GB
dc.subject.meshData Collectionen_GB
dc.subject.meshEducation, Medical, Undergraduateen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIrelanden_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMedical Staff, Hospitalen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Teachingen_GB
dc.titleAnaesthetic specialist registrars in Ireland: current teaching practices and perceptions of their role as undergraduate teachers.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentCork University Hospital, Department of Anaesthetics, Intensive Care and Pain, Medicine, Wilton, Cork, Ireland. kenwalsh@ireland.comen_GB
dc.identifier.journalEuropean journal of anaesthesiologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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