Physiological basis for novel drug therapies used to treat the inflammatory bowel diseases I. Pathophysiological basis and prospects for probiotic therapy in inflammatory bowel disease.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208926
Title:
Physiological basis for novel drug therapies used to treat the inflammatory bowel diseases I. Pathophysiological basis and prospects for probiotic therapy in inflammatory bowel disease.
Authors:
Shanahan, Fergus
Affiliation:
Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, Department of Medicine, Clinical Science Bldg.,, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland. F.Shanahan@ucc.ie
Citation:
Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2005 Mar;288(3):G417-21.
Journal:
American journal of physiology. Gastrointestinal and liver physiology
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208926
DOI:
10.1152/ajpgi.00421.2004
PubMed ID:
15701620
Abstract:
Mechanisms underlying the conditioning influence of the intestinal flora on mucosal homeostasis, including development and function of immune responses, are attracting increasing scientific scrutiny. The intestinal flora is a positive asset to host defense, but some of its components may, in genetically susceptible hosts, become a risk factor for development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It follows that strategies to enhance assets or offset microbial liabilities represent a therapeutic option; therein lies the rationale for manipulation of the flora in IBD. In addition, the diversity of regulatory signalling among the flora and host epithelum, lymphoid tissue, and neuromuscular apparatus is an untapped reservoir from which novel therapeutics may be mined. Moreover, the capacity to engineer food-grade or commensal bacteria to deliver therapeutic molecules to the intestinal mucosa promises to extend the scope of microbial manipulation for the benefit of mankind.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Animals; Humans; Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/*drug; therapy/immunology/microbiology/*physiopathology; *Probiotics; Signal Transduction
ISSN:
0193-1857 (Print); 0193-1857 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorShanahan, Fergusen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:07:37Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:07:37Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:07:37Z-
dc.identifier.citationAm J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2005 Mar;288(3):G417-21.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0193-1857 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0193-1857 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid15701620en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1152/ajpgi.00421.2004en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/208926-
dc.description.abstractMechanisms underlying the conditioning influence of the intestinal flora on mucosal homeostasis, including development and function of immune responses, are attracting increasing scientific scrutiny. The intestinal flora is a positive asset to host defense, but some of its components may, in genetically susceptible hosts, become a risk factor for development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It follows that strategies to enhance assets or offset microbial liabilities represent a therapeutic option; therein lies the rationale for manipulation of the flora in IBD. In addition, the diversity of regulatory signalling among the flora and host epithelum, lymphoid tissue, and neuromuscular apparatus is an untapped reservoir from which novel therapeutics may be mined. Moreover, the capacity to engineer food-grade or commensal bacteria to deliver therapeutic molecules to the intestinal mucosa promises to extend the scope of microbial manipulation for the benefit of mankind.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshInflammatory Bowel Diseases/*drugen_GB
dc.subject.meshtherapy/immunology/microbiology/*physiopathologyen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Probioticsen_GB
dc.subject.meshSignal Transductionen_GB
dc.titlePhysiological basis for novel drug therapies used to treat the inflammatory bowel diseases I. Pathophysiological basis and prospects for probiotic therapy in inflammatory bowel disease.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentAlimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, Department of Medicine, Clinical Science Bldg.,, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland. F.Shanahan@ucc.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalAmerican journal of physiology. Gastrointestinal and liver physiologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.