Duration of increased bleeding tendency after cessation of aspirin therapy.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208915
Title:
Duration of increased bleeding tendency after cessation of aspirin therapy.
Authors:
Cahill, Ronan A; McGreal, Gerard T; Crowe, Basil H; Ryan, Damien A; Manning, Brian J; Cahill, Mary R; Redmond, H Paul
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, NUI (Cork), Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland.
Citation:
J Am Coll Surg. 2005 Apr;200(4):564-73; quiz A59-61.
Journal:
Journal of the American College of Surgeons
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208915
DOI:
10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2004.11.002
PubMed ID:
15804471
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Aspirin has a significant effect on hemostasis, so it is often recommended that patients taking aspirin discontinue treatment before elective surgery. While off aspirin, these patients may be at risk of thrombosis. The optimum period of time that aspirin should be withheld is controversial. The aim of this study was to establish the duration of the antihemostatic effect of prolonged aspirin therapy. STUDY DESIGN: In a prospective study, 51 healthy volunteers were randomly assigned into 3 groups, each receiving an identical tablet for 14 days. One group received a placebo tablet; individuals in the other two groups received either 75 mg or 300 mg of aspirin once a day. Template bleeding times and specific platelet function testing (using the PFA-100; Dade Behring) were carried out on subjects before therapy and again after its completion until they returned to baseline. RESULTS: Thirty-eight volunteers complied sufficiently with the protocol to provide useful results. All bleeding times normalized within 96 hours and all platelet function tests within 144 hours after stopping aspirin. There was no demonstrable hemostatic defect in any volunteer persisting by or beyond the sixth day after treatment cessation. There was no apparent difference in duration of effect between those taking either 75 mg or 300 mg of aspirin. CONCLUSIONS: This study uses sensitive measures of platelet function to demonstrate the duration of increased bleeding tendency after withdrawal of aspirin therapy. It supports discontinuation of aspirin therapy 5 days before elective surgery (with the operation being performed on the sixth day).
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adult; Aspirin/*administration & dosage; *Bleeding Time; Double-Blind Method; Female; Hemostasis/*drug effects; Humans; Male; Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/*administration & dosage; Platelet Function Tests; Prospective Studies
ISSN:
1072-7515 (Print); 1072-7515 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCahill, Ronan Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcGreal, Gerard Ten_GB
dc.contributor.authorCrowe, Basil Hen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRyan, Damien Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorManning, Brian Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCahill, Mary Ren_GB
dc.contributor.authorRedmond, H Paulen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:07:18Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:07:18Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:07:18Z-
dc.identifier.citationJ Am Coll Surg. 2005 Apr;200(4):564-73; quiz A59-61.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1072-7515 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1072-7515 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid15804471en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2004.11.002en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/208915-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Aspirin has a significant effect on hemostasis, so it is often recommended that patients taking aspirin discontinue treatment before elective surgery. While off aspirin, these patients may be at risk of thrombosis. The optimum period of time that aspirin should be withheld is controversial. The aim of this study was to establish the duration of the antihemostatic effect of prolonged aspirin therapy. STUDY DESIGN: In a prospective study, 51 healthy volunteers were randomly assigned into 3 groups, each receiving an identical tablet for 14 days. One group received a placebo tablet; individuals in the other two groups received either 75 mg or 300 mg of aspirin once a day. Template bleeding times and specific platelet function testing (using the PFA-100; Dade Behring) were carried out on subjects before therapy and again after its completion until they returned to baseline. RESULTS: Thirty-eight volunteers complied sufficiently with the protocol to provide useful results. All bleeding times normalized within 96 hours and all platelet function tests within 144 hours after stopping aspirin. There was no demonstrable hemostatic defect in any volunteer persisting by or beyond the sixth day after treatment cessation. There was no apparent difference in duration of effect between those taking either 75 mg or 300 mg of aspirin. CONCLUSIONS: This study uses sensitive measures of platelet function to demonstrate the duration of increased bleeding tendency after withdrawal of aspirin therapy. It supports discontinuation of aspirin therapy 5 days before elective surgery (with the operation being performed on the sixth day).en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshAspirin/*administration & dosageen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Bleeding Timeen_GB
dc.subject.meshDouble-Blind Methoden_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHemostasis/*drug effectsen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshPlatelet Aggregation Inhibitors/*administration & dosageen_GB
dc.subject.meshPlatelet Function Testsen_GB
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_GB
dc.titleDuration of increased bleeding tendency after cessation of aspirin therapy.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery, NUI (Cork), Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the American College of Surgeonsen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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