A retrospective study of the demographics of sport and exercise injuries in 1143 children presenting to an Irish emergency department over a 6-month period.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208914
Title:
A retrospective study of the demographics of sport and exercise injuries in 1143 children presenting to an Irish emergency department over a 6-month period.
Authors:
O'Rourke, Killian Patrick; Mun, Sean; Browne, Mary; Sheehan, John; Cusack, Steven; Molloy, Michael
Affiliation:
Department of Rheumatology and Sports Medicine, Cork University Hospital, Cork,, Ireland. killianorourke@ireland.com
Citation:
Eur J Pediatr. 2005 Jul;164(7):421-6. Epub 2005 Apr 6.
Journal:
European journal of pediatrics
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208914
DOI:
10.1007/s00431-005-1663-6
PubMed ID:
15812663
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to provide up-to-date data on the nature of sport related injury (SRI) presenting to a large emergency department in Ireland. Data were collected retrospectively on all children under 17 years of age with a SRI, presenting to the emergency department of a major teaching hospital, over a 6-month period, and entered into a Microsoft Access database. A total of 1143 SRIs were identified which had occurred over a 6-month period, from 53 different sports. There was a high proportion of humerus and back SRIs in females, and a higher proportion of falls in females. Males were more frequently involved in collisions. Children with SRI were not using protective equipment in 94% of cases. Advice regarding rest, ice, compression and elevation (RICE)/general injury advice was given to 25% of patients and regarding injury preventive measures in less than 0.1% of cases. Of children, 28% had previously attended with a SRI. We also observed a lower rate of analgesia prescription to children under age 4, compared to children of an older age, and rarity of topical analgesic prescription. Overall, 10% of SRIs required admission, with 65% of these cases needing orthopaedic intervention. CONCLUSION: The data provided from this study should raise awareness of the different aspects of sport related injuries affecting children, and may help to provide the impetus for suggesting direction and guidance for reducing such events.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Accidental Falls/statistics & numerical data; Arm Injuries/epidemiology; Athletic Injuries/*epidemiology; Craniocerebral Trauma/epidemiology; Emergency Service, Hospital; Female; Football/injuries; Fractures, Bone/epidemiology; Humans; Ireland/epidemiology; Male; Retrospective Studies; Skating/injuries; Soccer/injuries
ISSN:
0340-6199 (Print); 0340-6199 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Rourke, Killian Patricken_GB
dc.contributor.authorMun, Seanen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrowne, Maryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSheehan, Johnen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCusack, Stevenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMolloy, Michaelen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:07:16Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:07:16Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:07:16Z-
dc.identifier.citationEur J Pediatr. 2005 Jul;164(7):421-6. Epub 2005 Apr 6.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0340-6199 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0340-6199 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid15812663en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00431-005-1663-6en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/208914-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to provide up-to-date data on the nature of sport related injury (SRI) presenting to a large emergency department in Ireland. Data were collected retrospectively on all children under 17 years of age with a SRI, presenting to the emergency department of a major teaching hospital, over a 6-month period, and entered into a Microsoft Access database. A total of 1143 SRIs were identified which had occurred over a 6-month period, from 53 different sports. There was a high proportion of humerus and back SRIs in females, and a higher proportion of falls in females. Males were more frequently involved in collisions. Children with SRI were not using protective equipment in 94% of cases. Advice regarding rest, ice, compression and elevation (RICE)/general injury advice was given to 25% of patients and regarding injury preventive measures in less than 0.1% of cases. Of children, 28% had previously attended with a SRI. We also observed a lower rate of analgesia prescription to children under age 4, compared to children of an older age, and rarity of topical analgesic prescription. Overall, 10% of SRIs required admission, with 65% of these cases needing orthopaedic intervention. CONCLUSION: The data provided from this study should raise awareness of the different aspects of sport related injuries affecting children, and may help to provide the impetus for suggesting direction and guidance for reducing such events.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAccidental Falls/statistics & numerical dataen_GB
dc.subject.meshArm Injuries/epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshAthletic Injuries/*epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshCraniocerebral Trauma/epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshEmergency Service, Hospitalen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshFootball/injuriesen_GB
dc.subject.meshFractures, Bone/epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIreland/epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshSkating/injuriesen_GB
dc.subject.meshSoccer/injuriesen_GB
dc.titleA retrospective study of the demographics of sport and exercise injuries in 1143 children presenting to an Irish emergency department over a 6-month period.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Rheumatology and Sports Medicine, Cork University Hospital, Cork,, Ireland. killianorourke@ireland.comen_GB
dc.identifier.journalEuropean journal of pediatricsen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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