Immediate impact of 'penalty points legislation' on acute hospital trauma services.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208900
Title:
Immediate impact of 'penalty points legislation' on acute hospital trauma services.
Authors:
Lenehan, Brian; Street, John; Barry, Kieran; Mullan, George
Affiliation:
Department of Trauma and Orthopaedics, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland., brian@blenehan.com
Citation:
Injury. 2005 Aug;36(8):912-6.
Journal:
Injury
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208900
DOI:
10.1016/j.injury.2005.03.008
PubMed ID:
15998514
Abstract:
Road traffic accident (RTA) related mortality and injury may be reduced by up to 40% with the introduction of 'road safety' legislation. Little is known regarding changes in pattern of injury and overall resource impact on acute trauma services. This prospective study examines RTA related admissions, injuries sustained and resultant sub-speciality operative workload in a Level 1 Trauma Centre during the 12 months immediately prior to and following the introduction of 'penalty points' legislation. Eight hundred and twenty RTA related admissions were identified over the 24-month period from 01/11/2001 to 31/10/2003. There was a 36.7% decrease in RTA related admissions subsequent to the introduction of new legislation. Bed occupancy was almost halved. However, the relative Orthopaedic workload increased from 34% to 41% with a 10% increase in relative bed occupancy. The pattern of orthopaedic injury was significantly altered with a >50% absolute reduction in high velocity injuries. Curiously, there was no change in the absolute number of spinal fractures seen. This favourable early Irish experience of 'penalty points' legislation mirrors that of worldwide published literature. Our findings demonstrate that the injury reduction effects were primarily enjoyed by non-orthopaedic sub-specialities. Such findings mandate consideration when allocating vital resources to sub-specialities within busy trauma units.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Accidents, Traffic/prevention & control/*statistics & numerical data; Automobile Driving/*legislation & jurisprudence; Emergency Medical Services; Humans; Ireland/epidemiology; Length of Stay; Prospective Studies; Wounds and Injuries/epidemiology
ISSN:
0020-1383 (Print); 0020-1383 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLenehan, Brianen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStreet, Johnen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarry, Kieranen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMullan, Georgeen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:06:52Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:06:52Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:06:52Z-
dc.identifier.citationInjury. 2005 Aug;36(8):912-6.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0020-1383 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0020-1383 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid15998514en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.injury.2005.03.008en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/208900-
dc.description.abstractRoad traffic accident (RTA) related mortality and injury may be reduced by up to 40% with the introduction of 'road safety' legislation. Little is known regarding changes in pattern of injury and overall resource impact on acute trauma services. This prospective study examines RTA related admissions, injuries sustained and resultant sub-speciality operative workload in a Level 1 Trauma Centre during the 12 months immediately prior to and following the introduction of 'penalty points' legislation. Eight hundred and twenty RTA related admissions were identified over the 24-month period from 01/11/2001 to 31/10/2003. There was a 36.7% decrease in RTA related admissions subsequent to the introduction of new legislation. Bed occupancy was almost halved. However, the relative Orthopaedic workload increased from 34% to 41% with a 10% increase in relative bed occupancy. The pattern of orthopaedic injury was significantly altered with a >50% absolute reduction in high velocity injuries. Curiously, there was no change in the absolute number of spinal fractures seen. This favourable early Irish experience of 'penalty points' legislation mirrors that of worldwide published literature. Our findings demonstrate that the injury reduction effects were primarily enjoyed by non-orthopaedic sub-specialities. Such findings mandate consideration when allocating vital resources to sub-specialities within busy trauma units.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAccidents, Traffic/prevention & control/*statistics & numerical dataen_GB
dc.subject.meshAutomobile Driving/*legislation & jurisprudenceen_GB
dc.subject.meshEmergency Medical Servicesen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIreland/epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshLength of Stayen_GB
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshWounds and Injuries/epidemiologyen_GB
dc.titleImmediate impact of 'penalty points legislation' on acute hospital trauma services.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Trauma and Orthopaedics, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland., brian@blenehan.comen_GB
dc.identifier.journalInjuryen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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