Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208896
Title:
Ocular injury in hurling.
Authors:
Flynn, T H; Fennessy, K; Horgan, N; Walsh, B; O'Connell, E; Cleary, P; Beatty, S
Affiliation:
Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland. tomhenry75@hotmail.com
Citation:
Br J Sports Med. 2005 Aug;39(8):493-6; discussion 496.
Journal:
British journal of sports medicine
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208896
DOI:
10.1136/bjsm.2004.013102
PubMed ID:
16046328
Abstract:
OBJECTIVES: To describe the clinical characteristics of ocular injuries sustained in hurling in the south of Ireland and to investigate reasons for non-use of protective headgear and eye wear. METHODS: Retrospective review of the case notes of 310 patients who attended Cork University Hospital or Waterford Regional Hospital between 1 January 1994 and 31 December 2002 with ocular injuries sustained during a hurling match. A confidential questionnaire on reasons for non-use of protective headgear and eye wear was completed by 130 players. RESULTS: Hurling related eye injuries occurred most commonly in young men. Fifty two patients (17%) required hospital admission, with hyphaema accounting for 71% of admissions. Ten injuries required intraocular surgical INTERVENTION: retinal detachment repair (5); macular hole surgery (1); repair of partial thickness corneal laceration (1); repair of globe perforation (1); enucleation (1); trabeculectomy for post-traumatic glaucoma (1). Fourteen eyes (4.5%) had a final best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of <6/12 and six (2%) had BCVA <3/60. In the survey, 63 players (48.5%) reported wearing no protective facemask while playing hurling. Impairment of vision was the most common reason cited for non-use. CONCLUSIONS: Hurling related injury is a significant, and preventable, cause of ocular morbidity in young men in Ireland. The routine use of appropriate protective headgear and faceguards would result in a dramatic reduction in the incidence and severity of these injuries, and should be mandatory.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Athletic Injuries/*prevention & control; Attitude to Health; Child; Eye Injuries/*prevention & control; Eye Protective Devices/*utilization; Head Protective Devices/*utilization; Humans; Hyphema/prevention & control; Injury Severity Score; Ireland; Male; Middle Aged; Retrospective Studies; Sports/*psychology
ISSN:
1473-0480 (Electronic); 0306-3674 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFlynn, T Hen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFennessy, Ken_GB
dc.contributor.authorHorgan, Nen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, Ben_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Connell, Een_GB
dc.contributor.authorCleary, Pen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBeatty, Sen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:06:45Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:06:45Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:06:45Z-
dc.identifier.citationBr J Sports Med. 2005 Aug;39(8):493-6; discussion 496.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1473-0480 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0306-3674 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid16046328en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bjsm.2004.013102en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/208896-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To describe the clinical characteristics of ocular injuries sustained in hurling in the south of Ireland and to investigate reasons for non-use of protective headgear and eye wear. METHODS: Retrospective review of the case notes of 310 patients who attended Cork University Hospital or Waterford Regional Hospital between 1 January 1994 and 31 December 2002 with ocular injuries sustained during a hurling match. A confidential questionnaire on reasons for non-use of protective headgear and eye wear was completed by 130 players. RESULTS: Hurling related eye injuries occurred most commonly in young men. Fifty two patients (17%) required hospital admission, with hyphaema accounting for 71% of admissions. Ten injuries required intraocular surgical INTERVENTION: retinal detachment repair (5); macular hole surgery (1); repair of partial thickness corneal laceration (1); repair of globe perforation (1); enucleation (1); trabeculectomy for post-traumatic glaucoma (1). Fourteen eyes (4.5%) had a final best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of <6/12 and six (2%) had BCVA <3/60. In the survey, 63 players (48.5%) reported wearing no protective facemask while playing hurling. Impairment of vision was the most common reason cited for non-use. CONCLUSIONS: Hurling related injury is a significant, and preventable, cause of ocular morbidity in young men in Ireland. The routine use of appropriate protective headgear and faceguards would result in a dramatic reduction in the incidence and severity of these injuries, and should be mandatory.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshAgeden_GB
dc.subject.meshAthletic Injuries/*prevention & controlen_GB
dc.subject.meshAttitude to Healthen_GB
dc.subject.meshChilden_GB
dc.subject.meshEye Injuries/*prevention & controlen_GB
dc.subject.meshEye Protective Devices/*utilizationen_GB
dc.subject.meshHead Protective Devices/*utilizationen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshHyphema/prevention & controlen_GB
dc.subject.meshInjury Severity Scoreen_GB
dc.subject.meshIrelanden_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshSports/*psychologyen_GB
dc.titleOcular injury in hurling.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentCork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland. tomhenry75@hotmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.journalBritish journal of sports medicineen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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