Changing trends in the management of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis--an audit over 11 years.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208893
Title:
Changing trends in the management of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis--an audit over 11 years.
Authors:
Doyle, D; O'Neill, M; Kelly, D
Affiliation:
Dept. of Radiology, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland. doyledj@hotmail.com
Citation:
Ir J Med Sci. 2005 Apr-Jun;174(2):33-5.
Journal:
Irish journal of medical science
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208893
PubMed ID:
16094910
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: This article is a follow-up to an audit performed by the Department of Surgery and published in the Irish Journal of Medical Science in 1996. This audit reviewed all cases of Infantile Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis (IHPS) operated on over 22 years up to 1991. AIMS: We aim to demonstrate that radiologic investigations, namely barium meal and ultrasound, have been increasingly employed in the diagnosis of IHPS. In addition, ultrasound is now the investigation of choice. METHODS: We have reviewed all cases of IHPS, at the same institution, over the subsequent 11 years, with reference to any radiological investigations performed. In the previous study, the diagnosis of IHPS was made clinically in 92.6% with the remainder diagnosed radiologically. RESULTS: Over 11 years, 157 patients were diagnosed with IHPS. Male to female ratio was 4.06:1. Median age was four weeks (range 1-18 weeks).Twenty-four per cent had a barium meal, 36% had an ultrasound and 13% had both performed. CONCLUSION: We conclude a change in practice in the management of IHPS with radiology, particularly ultrasound, playing an increasing role.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Female; Humans; Infant; Ireland; Male; Medical Audit; Patient Care Management/trends; Pyloric Stenosis, Hypertrophic/*diagnosis/radiography/ultrasonography
ISSN:
0021-1265 (Print); 0021-1265 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDoyle, Den_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Neill, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Den_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:06:40Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:06:40Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:06:40Z-
dc.identifier.citationIr J Med Sci. 2005 Apr-Jun;174(2):33-5.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0021-1265 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0021-1265 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid16094910en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/208893-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: This article is a follow-up to an audit performed by the Department of Surgery and published in the Irish Journal of Medical Science in 1996. This audit reviewed all cases of Infantile Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis (IHPS) operated on over 22 years up to 1991. AIMS: We aim to demonstrate that radiologic investigations, namely barium meal and ultrasound, have been increasingly employed in the diagnosis of IHPS. In addition, ultrasound is now the investigation of choice. METHODS: We have reviewed all cases of IHPS, at the same institution, over the subsequent 11 years, with reference to any radiological investigations performed. In the previous study, the diagnosis of IHPS was made clinically in 92.6% with the remainder diagnosed radiologically. RESULTS: Over 11 years, 157 patients were diagnosed with IHPS. Male to female ratio was 4.06:1. Median age was four weeks (range 1-18 weeks).Twenty-four per cent had a barium meal, 36% had an ultrasound and 13% had both performed. CONCLUSION: We conclude a change in practice in the management of IHPS with radiology, particularly ultrasound, playing an increasing role.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshInfanten_GB
dc.subject.meshIrelanden_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMedical Auditen_GB
dc.subject.meshPatient Care Management/trendsen_GB
dc.subject.meshPyloric Stenosis, Hypertrophic/*diagnosis/radiography/ultrasonographyen_GB
dc.titleChanging trends in the management of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis--an audit over 11 years.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDept. of Radiology, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland. doyledj@hotmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.journalIrish journal of medical scienceen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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