Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208889
Title:
Regulatory T-cells and autoimmunity.
Authors:
Ni Choileain, Niamh; Redmond, H P
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland., nnc1@eircom.net
Citation:
J Surg Res. 2006 Jan;130(1):124-35. Epub 2005 Sep 8.
Journal:
The Journal of surgical research
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208889
DOI:
10.1016/j.jss.2005.07.033
PubMed ID:
16154142
Abstract:
Approximately 20% of the population is affected by autoimmune or inflammatory diseases mediated by an abnormal immune response. A characteristic feature of autoimmune disease is the selective targeting of a single cell type, organ or tissue by certain populations of autoreactive T-cells. Examples of such diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), all of which are characterized by chronic inflammation, tissue destruction and target organ malfunction. Although strong evidence links most autoimmune diseases to specific genes, considerable controversy prevails regarding the role of regulatory T-cell populations in the disease process. These cells are now also believed to play a key role in mediating transplantation tolerance and inhibiting the induction of tumor immunity. Though the concept of therapeutic immune regulation aimed at treating autoimmune pathology has been validated in many animal models, the development of strategies for the treatment of human autoimmune disorders remains in its infancy. The main obstacles to this include the conflicting findings of different model systems, as well as the contrasting functions of regulatory T-cells and cytokines involved in the development of such disorders. This review examines the role of regulatory T-cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and describes the therapeutic potential of these cells for the prevention of immune-mediated pathologies in the future. Although much remains to be learned about such pathologies, a clearer understanding of the mechanisms by which regulatory T-cells function will undoubtedly lead to exciting new possibilities for immunotherapeutics.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Animals; Autoimmunity/*immunology; Humans; Neoplasms/*immunology; T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/*immunology; Transplantation Immunology/*immunology
ISSN:
0022-4804 (Print); 0022-4804 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNi Choileain, Niamhen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRedmond, H Pen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:06:34Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:06:34Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:06:34Z-
dc.identifier.citationJ Surg Res. 2006 Jan;130(1):124-35. Epub 2005 Sep 8.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0022-4804 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0022-4804 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid16154142en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jss.2005.07.033en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/208889-
dc.description.abstractApproximately 20% of the population is affected by autoimmune or inflammatory diseases mediated by an abnormal immune response. A characteristic feature of autoimmune disease is the selective targeting of a single cell type, organ or tissue by certain populations of autoreactive T-cells. Examples of such diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), all of which are characterized by chronic inflammation, tissue destruction and target organ malfunction. Although strong evidence links most autoimmune diseases to specific genes, considerable controversy prevails regarding the role of regulatory T-cell populations in the disease process. These cells are now also believed to play a key role in mediating transplantation tolerance and inhibiting the induction of tumor immunity. Though the concept of therapeutic immune regulation aimed at treating autoimmune pathology has been validated in many animal models, the development of strategies for the treatment of human autoimmune disorders remains in its infancy. The main obstacles to this include the conflicting findings of different model systems, as well as the contrasting functions of regulatory T-cells and cytokines involved in the development of such disorders. This review examines the role of regulatory T-cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and describes the therapeutic potential of these cells for the prevention of immune-mediated pathologies in the future. Although much remains to be learned about such pathologies, a clearer understanding of the mechanisms by which regulatory T-cells function will undoubtedly lead to exciting new possibilities for immunotherapeutics.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_GB
dc.subject.meshAutoimmunity/*immunologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms/*immunologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshT-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/*immunologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshTransplantation Immunology/*immunologyen_GB
dc.titleRegulatory T-cells and autoimmunity.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland., nnc1@eircom.neten_GB
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of surgical researchen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-
All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.