What is the evidence for the use of probiotics in functional disorders?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208884
Title:
What is the evidence for the use of probiotics in functional disorders?
Authors:
Quigley, Eamonn M M
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, Clinical Sciences Building, Cork University Hospital,, Cork, Ireland. e.quigley@ucc.ie
Citation:
Curr Gastroenterol Rep. 2008 Aug;10(4):379-84.
Journal:
Current gastroenterology reports
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208884
PubMed ID:
18627649
Abstract:
A rationale for the use of probiotics for a number of functional gastrointestinal symptoms and syndromes can be developed, and an experimental basis for their use continues to emerge, but data from well-conducted clinical trials of probiotics in this area remain scarce. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has attracted the most attention; recent revelations regarding the potential pathogenic roles of the enteric flora and immune activation have led to reawakened interest in bacterio-therapy for this common and challenging disorder. Some recent randomized, controlled studies attest to the efficacy of some probiotics in alleviating individual IBS symptoms, and selected strains have a more global impact. Evidence for long-term efficacy is also beginning to emerge, though more studies are needed in this regard. In other functional syndromes, data are far from adequate to make recommendations, but there is evidence for efficacy of probiotics in treating individual symptoms such as diarrhea, constipation, and bloating. The interpretation of much of the literature in this area is complicated by lack of quality control, use of many different species and strains, and, above all, significant deficiencies in trial methodology.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Animals; Constipation/rehabilitation; Diarrhea/therapy; Dyspepsia/therapy; Humans; Irritable Bowel Syndrome/microbiology/*therapy; Probiotics/*therapeutic use
ISSN:
1534-312X (Electronic); 1522-8037 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorQuigley, Eamonn M Men_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:06:25Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:06:25Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:06:25Z-
dc.identifier.citationCurr Gastroenterol Rep. 2008 Aug;10(4):379-84.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1534-312X (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1522-8037 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid18627649en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/208884-
dc.description.abstractA rationale for the use of probiotics for a number of functional gastrointestinal symptoms and syndromes can be developed, and an experimental basis for their use continues to emerge, but data from well-conducted clinical trials of probiotics in this area remain scarce. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has attracted the most attention; recent revelations regarding the potential pathogenic roles of the enteric flora and immune activation have led to reawakened interest in bacterio-therapy for this common and challenging disorder. Some recent randomized, controlled studies attest to the efficacy of some probiotics in alleviating individual IBS symptoms, and selected strains have a more global impact. Evidence for long-term efficacy is also beginning to emerge, though more studies are needed in this regard. In other functional syndromes, data are far from adequate to make recommendations, but there is evidence for efficacy of probiotics in treating individual symptoms such as diarrhea, constipation, and bloating. The interpretation of much of the literature in this area is complicated by lack of quality control, use of many different species and strains, and, above all, significant deficiencies in trial methodology.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_GB
dc.subject.meshConstipation/rehabilitationen_GB
dc.subject.meshDiarrhea/therapyen_GB
dc.subject.meshDyspepsia/therapyen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIrritable Bowel Syndrome/microbiology/*therapyen_GB
dc.subject.meshProbiotics/*therapeutic useen_GB
dc.titleWhat is the evidence for the use of probiotics in functional disorders?en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Clinical Sciences Building, Cork University Hospital,, Cork, Ireland. e.quigley@ucc.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalCurrent gastroenterology reportsen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-
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