The immunological consequences of injury.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208866
Title:
The immunological consequences of injury.
Authors:
Ni Choileain, N; Redmond, H P
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, Cork University Hospital, Ireland. nnc1@eircom.net
Citation:
Surgeon. 2006 Feb;4(1):23-31.
Journal:
The surgeon : journal of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons of Edinburgh and Ireland
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208866
PubMed ID:
16459497
Abstract:
Immediate and early trauma death rates are determined by "first hits" such as hypoxia, hypotension and organ injury, while late mortality correlates closely with "second hits" such as infection. An imbalance between the early systemic inflammatory response (SIRS), and the later compensatory counter-inflammatory response (CARS), is considered to be responsible for much post-traumatic morbidity and mortality. From a clinical perspective, this remains a significant healthcare problem, which has stimulated decades of experimental and clinical research aimed at understanding the functional effects of injury on the immune system. This review describes the impact of injury on the innate and adaptive immune systems. Though it is worth noting that the features of the immune response to injury overlap in many areas with immune dysregulation in sepsis, we attempt here to elucidate the mechanism by which injury predisposes to infection rather than to describe the alterations in host immunity consequent to established sepsis.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Antibody Formation/*physiology; Female; Humans; Immunity, Innate/*physiology; Immunocompromised Host/*immunology; Injury Severity Score; Male; Multiple Trauma/diagnosis/immunology/mortality; Prognosis; Risk Assessment; Survival Rate; Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis/*immunology/mortality; Wounds and Injuries/diagnosis/*immunology/mortality
ISSN:
1479-666X (Print); 1479-666X (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNi Choileain, Nen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRedmond, H Pen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:05:53Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:05:53Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:05:53Z-
dc.identifier.citationSurgeon. 2006 Feb;4(1):23-31.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1479-666X (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1479-666X (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid16459497en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/208866-
dc.description.abstractImmediate and early trauma death rates are determined by "first hits" such as hypoxia, hypotension and organ injury, while late mortality correlates closely with "second hits" such as infection. An imbalance between the early systemic inflammatory response (SIRS), and the later compensatory counter-inflammatory response (CARS), is considered to be responsible for much post-traumatic morbidity and mortality. From a clinical perspective, this remains a significant healthcare problem, which has stimulated decades of experimental and clinical research aimed at understanding the functional effects of injury on the immune system. This review describes the impact of injury on the innate and adaptive immune systems. Though it is worth noting that the features of the immune response to injury overlap in many areas with immune dysregulation in sepsis, we attempt here to elucidate the mechanism by which injury predisposes to infection rather than to describe the alterations in host immunity consequent to established sepsis.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAntibody Formation/*physiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshImmunity, Innate/*physiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshImmunocompromised Host/*immunologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshInjury Severity Scoreen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMultiple Trauma/diagnosis/immunology/mortalityen_GB
dc.subject.meshPrognosisen_GB
dc.subject.meshRisk Assessmenten_GB
dc.subject.meshSurvival Rateen_GB
dc.subject.meshSystemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis/*immunology/mortalityen_GB
dc.subject.meshWounds and Injuries/diagnosis/*immunology/mortalityen_GB
dc.titleThe immunological consequences of injury.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery, Cork University Hospital, Ireland. nnc1@eircom.neten_GB
dc.identifier.journalThe surgeon : journal of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons of Edinburgh and Irelanden_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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