The polymerase chain reaction and its application to clinical plastic surgery.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208845
Title:
The polymerase chain reaction and its application to clinical plastic surgery.
Authors:
Rea, S; O'Sullivan, S T
Affiliation:
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland. suzanne.rea@health.wa.gov.au
Citation:
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg. 2006;59(2):113-21.
Journal:
Journal of plastic, reconstructive & aesthetic surgery : JPRAS
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208845
PubMed ID:
16703854
Abstract:
Molecular biology has become an essential component in many fields of modern medical research, including plastic surgery. Research into the molecular mechanisms underlying many disease processes offer increased understanding of the pathogenesis of disease and provide exciting therapeutic possibilities. Yet for many clinicians, the presentation of much research into molecular biological processes is couched in confusing terminology and based on scientific techniques, the basis of which are frequently difficult for the clinician to understand. The purpose of this review is to present an introduction to some of the molecular biological techniques currently in use, namely the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and explore its applications to different aspects of plastic surgery. This review explores the role PCR now plays in all aspects of modern plastic surgery practise, with particular emphasis on normal and abnormal wound healing, the diagnosis of craniofacial anomalies, the diagnosis and treatment of cancer including melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, and burns.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Burns/immunology; Craniofacial Abnormalities/genetics; Head and Neck Neoplasms/surgery; Humans; Melanoma/diagnosis; Polymerase Chain Reaction/*methods; Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/*methods; Skin Neoplasms/diagnosis; Wound Healing/genetics
ISSN:
1748-6815 (Print); 1748-6815 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRea, Sen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Sullivan, S Ten_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:05:14Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:05:14Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:05:14Z-
dc.identifier.citationJ Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg. 2006;59(2):113-21.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1748-6815 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1748-6815 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid16703854en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/208845-
dc.description.abstractMolecular biology has become an essential component in many fields of modern medical research, including plastic surgery. Research into the molecular mechanisms underlying many disease processes offer increased understanding of the pathogenesis of disease and provide exciting therapeutic possibilities. Yet for many clinicians, the presentation of much research into molecular biological processes is couched in confusing terminology and based on scientific techniques, the basis of which are frequently difficult for the clinician to understand. The purpose of this review is to present an introduction to some of the molecular biological techniques currently in use, namely the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and explore its applications to different aspects of plastic surgery. This review explores the role PCR now plays in all aspects of modern plastic surgery practise, with particular emphasis on normal and abnormal wound healing, the diagnosis of craniofacial anomalies, the diagnosis and treatment of cancer including melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, and burns.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshBurns/immunologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshCraniofacial Abnormalities/geneticsen_GB
dc.subject.meshHead and Neck Neoplasms/surgeryen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshMelanoma/diagnosisen_GB
dc.subject.meshPolymerase Chain Reaction/*methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshReconstructive Surgical Procedures/*methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshSkin Neoplasms/diagnosisen_GB
dc.subject.meshWound Healing/geneticsen_GB
dc.titleThe polymerase chain reaction and its application to clinical plastic surgery.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland. suzanne.rea@health.wa.gov.auen_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of plastic, reconstructive & aesthetic surgery : JPRASen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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