Exploitation of the Toll-like receptor system in cancer: a doubled-edged sword?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208826
Title:
Exploitation of the Toll-like receptor system in cancer: a doubled-edged sword?
Authors:
Killeen, S D; Wang, J H; Andrews, E J; Redmond, H P
Affiliation:
Department of Academic Surgery, National University of Ireland (NUI)/University, College Cork (UCC), Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland.
Citation:
Br J Cancer. 2006 Aug 7;95(3):247-52.
Journal:
British journal of cancer
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208826
DOI:
10.1038/sj.bjc.6603275
PubMed ID:
16892041
Abstract:
The toll-like receptor (TLR) system constitutes a pylogenetically ancient, evolutionary conserved, archetypal pattern recognition system, which underpins pathogen recognition by and activation of the immune system. Toll-like receptor agonists have long been used as immunoadjuvants in anti cancer immunotherapy. However, TLRs are increasingly implicated in human disease pathogenesis and an expanding body of both clinical and experimental evidence suggests that the neoplastic process may subvert TLR signalling pathways to advance cancer progression. Recent discoveries in the TLR system open a multitude of potential therapeutic avenues. Extrapolation of such TLR system manipulations to a clinical oncological setting demands care to prevent potentially deleterious activation of TLR-mediated survival pathways. Thus, the TLR system is a double-edge sword, which needs to be carefully wielded in the setting of neoplastic disease.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Disease Progression; Humans; Immunotherapy; Models, Immunological; Neoplasms/*immunology/therapy; Signal Transduction/immunology; Toll-Like Receptors/*immunology
ISSN:
0007-0920 (Print); 0007-0920 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKilleen, S Den_GB
dc.contributor.authorWang, J Hen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAndrews, E Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRedmond, H Pen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:04:38Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:04:38Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:04:38Z-
dc.identifier.citationBr J Cancer. 2006 Aug 7;95(3):247-52.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0007-0920 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0007-0920 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid16892041en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/sj.bjc.6603275en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/208826-
dc.description.abstractThe toll-like receptor (TLR) system constitutes a pylogenetically ancient, evolutionary conserved, archetypal pattern recognition system, which underpins pathogen recognition by and activation of the immune system. Toll-like receptor agonists have long been used as immunoadjuvants in anti cancer immunotherapy. However, TLRs are increasingly implicated in human disease pathogenesis and an expanding body of both clinical and experimental evidence suggests that the neoplastic process may subvert TLR signalling pathways to advance cancer progression. Recent discoveries in the TLR system open a multitude of potential therapeutic avenues. Extrapolation of such TLR system manipulations to a clinical oncological setting demands care to prevent potentially deleterious activation of TLR-mediated survival pathways. Thus, the TLR system is a double-edge sword, which needs to be carefully wielded in the setting of neoplastic disease.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshDisease Progressionen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshImmunotherapyen_GB
dc.subject.meshModels, Immunologicalen_GB
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms/*immunology/therapyen_GB
dc.subject.meshSignal Transduction/immunologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshToll-Like Receptors/*immunologyen_GB
dc.titleExploitation of the Toll-like receptor system in cancer: a doubled-edged sword?en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Academic Surgery, National University of Ireland (NUI)/University, College Cork (UCC), Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalBritish journal of canceren_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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