A comparison of paediatric soccer, gaelic football and rugby injuries presenting to an emergency department in Ireland.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208821
Title:
A comparison of paediatric soccer, gaelic football and rugby injuries presenting to an emergency department in Ireland.
Authors:
O'Rourke, K P; Quinn, F; Mun, S; Browne, M; Sheehan, J; Cusack, S; Molloy, M
Affiliation:
Department of Rheumatology and Sports Medicine, Cork University Hospital, Cork,, Ireland. killianorourke@ireland.com
Citation:
Injury. 2007 Jan;38(1):104-11. Epub 2006 Sep 20.
Journal:
Injury
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208821
DOI:
10.1016/j.injury.2006.06.010
PubMed ID:
16989834
Abstract:
OBJECTIVES: Children presenting with sport related injuries (SRIs) as a result of soccer, rugby and gaelic football are frequently seen in an emergency medicine (EM) setting in Ireland. A comparison of the demographics of injuries in these three sports has however not previously been performed. The purpose of this study was to provide up-to-date data on the nature of these SRIs. METHOD: Data was collected retrospectively on all children (<17 years of age), injured in these three sports, presenting to an emergency medicine department over 6 months, and was entered into a database for analysis. RESULTS: Retrospective analysis was performed on 23,000 charts, and 409 SRIs were identified over a 6-month period. None of the children reported using any form of protective gear, and 27% reported a previous presentation to the emergency department with a SRI. Most injuries were as a result of soccer (56%), with 24% occurring in gaelic football, and 20% occurring in rugby. The predominant mechanism of injury was different in each sport, in soccer-falls (38%), in gaelic football-collisions with objects (balls) (37%), and in rugby-collision with persons (55%). Although the predominant type of injury in soccer and gaelic football was a fracture, accounting for 50% and 42% of injuries, respectively, in rugby however, skin/soft tissue injuries presented more commonly, accounting for 44% of injuries. When the general site of injury was investigated, the upper limb accounted for the majority of SRIs in each sport. In the management of SRIs, oral analgesics were prescribed in 50%, however, it was observed that no use was made of topical, intramuscular or rectal analgesic routes of administration. In addition it was observed that RICE/general injury advice was given in only 27%, physiotherapy was requested in 2%, and no injury prevention advice was given to any child. Overall, 8% required admission. CONCLUSIONS: The data provided from this study may raise awareness of the nature of SRIs affecting children in each of these three sports, and may be useful in formulating much needed injury prevention strategies.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adolescent; Age Distribution; Child; Child, Preschool; *Emergency Service, Hospital; Female; Football/*injuries; Humans; Ireland; Male; Retrospective Studies; Soccer/*injuries; Treatment Outcome; Wounds and Injuries/etiology/pathology/therapy
ISSN:
0020-1383 (Print); 0020-1383 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Rourke, K Pen_GB
dc.contributor.authorQuinn, Fen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMun, Sen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrowne, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorSheehan, Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCusack, Sen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMolloy, Men_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-03T15:04:29Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-03T15:04:29Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-03T15:04:29Z-
dc.identifier.citationInjury. 2007 Jan;38(1):104-11. Epub 2006 Sep 20.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0020-1383 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0020-1383 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid16989834en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.injury.2006.06.010en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/208821-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: Children presenting with sport related injuries (SRIs) as a result of soccer, rugby and gaelic football are frequently seen in an emergency medicine (EM) setting in Ireland. A comparison of the demographics of injuries in these three sports has however not previously been performed. The purpose of this study was to provide up-to-date data on the nature of these SRIs. METHOD: Data was collected retrospectively on all children (<17 years of age), injured in these three sports, presenting to an emergency medicine department over 6 months, and was entered into a database for analysis. RESULTS: Retrospective analysis was performed on 23,000 charts, and 409 SRIs were identified over a 6-month period. None of the children reported using any form of protective gear, and 27% reported a previous presentation to the emergency department with a SRI. Most injuries were as a result of soccer (56%), with 24% occurring in gaelic football, and 20% occurring in rugby. The predominant mechanism of injury was different in each sport, in soccer-falls (38%), in gaelic football-collisions with objects (balls) (37%), and in rugby-collision with persons (55%). Although the predominant type of injury in soccer and gaelic football was a fracture, accounting for 50% and 42% of injuries, respectively, in rugby however, skin/soft tissue injuries presented more commonly, accounting for 44% of injuries. When the general site of injury was investigated, the upper limb accounted for the majority of SRIs in each sport. In the management of SRIs, oral analgesics were prescribed in 50%, however, it was observed that no use was made of topical, intramuscular or rectal analgesic routes of administration. In addition it was observed that RICE/general injury advice was given in only 27%, physiotherapy was requested in 2%, and no injury prevention advice was given to any child. Overall, 8% required admission. CONCLUSIONS: The data provided from this study may raise awareness of the nature of SRIs affecting children in each of these three sports, and may be useful in formulating much needed injury prevention strategies.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_GB
dc.subject.meshAge Distributionen_GB
dc.subject.meshChilden_GB
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Emergency Service, Hospitalen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshFootball/*injuriesen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIrelanden_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshSoccer/*injuriesen_GB
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_GB
dc.subject.meshWounds and Injuries/etiology/pathology/therapyen_GB
dc.titleA comparison of paediatric soccer, gaelic football and rugby injuries presenting to an emergency department in Ireland.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Rheumatology and Sports Medicine, Cork University Hospital, Cork,, Ireland. killianorourke@ireland.comen_GB
dc.identifier.journalInjuryen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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