Epidural analgesia practices for labour: results of a 2005 national survey in Ireland.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208041
Title:
Epidural analgesia practices for labour: results of a 2005 national survey in Ireland.
Authors:
Fanning, Rebecca A; Briggs, Liam P; Carey, Michael F
Affiliation:
Department of Perioperative Medicine, Coombe Women and Infants University, Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. rebecca.fanning@gmail.com
Citation:
Eur J Anaesthesiol. 2009 Mar;26(3):235-44.
Journal:
European journal of anaesthesiology
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/208041
DOI:
10.1097/EJA.0b013e32831a459e
PubMed ID:
19237985
Abstract:
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The last 25 years have seen changes in the management of epidural analgesia for labour, including the advent of low-dose epidural analgesia, the development of new local anaesthetic agents, various regimes for maintaining epidural analgesia and the practice of combined spinal-epidural analgesia. We conducted a survey of Irish obstetric anaesthetists to obtain information regarding the conduct and management of obstetric epidural analgesia in Ireland in 2005. The specific objective of this survey was to discover whether new developments in obstetric anaesthesia have been incorporated into clinical practice. METHODS: A postal survey was sent to all anaesthetists with a clinical commitment for obstetric anaesthesia in the sites approved for training by the College of Anaesthetists, Ireland. RESULTS: Fifty-three per cent of anaesthetists surveyed responded. The majority of anaesthetists (98%) use low-dose epidural analgesia for the maintenance of analgesia. Only 11% use it for test-dosing and 32% for the induction of analgesia. The combined spinal-epidural analgesia method is used by 49%, but two-thirds of those who use it perform fewer than five per month. Patient-controlled epidural analgesia was in use at only one site. CONCLUSION: It appears that Irish obstetric anaesthetists have adopted the low-dose epidural analgesia trend for the maintenance of labour analgesia. This practice is not as widespread, however, for test dosing, the induction of analgesia dose or in the administration of intermittent epidural boluses to maintain analgesia when higher concentrations are used. Since its introduction in 2000, levobupivacaine has become the most popular local anaesthetic agent.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Analgesia, Epidural/*methods/*statistics & numerical data; Cesarean Section; Female; *Health Care Surveys; Humans; Ireland/epidemiology; Labor, Obstetric/*drug effects; Pregnancy; Time Factors
ISSN:
1365-2346 (Electronic); 0265-0215 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFanning, Rebecca Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBriggs, Liam Pen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCarey, Michael Fen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:58:31Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:58:31Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:58:31Z-
dc.identifier.citationEur J Anaesthesiol. 2009 Mar;26(3):235-44.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1365-2346 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0265-0215 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid19237985en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/EJA.0b013e32831a459een_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/208041-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The last 25 years have seen changes in the management of epidural analgesia for labour, including the advent of low-dose epidural analgesia, the development of new local anaesthetic agents, various regimes for maintaining epidural analgesia and the practice of combined spinal-epidural analgesia. We conducted a survey of Irish obstetric anaesthetists to obtain information regarding the conduct and management of obstetric epidural analgesia in Ireland in 2005. The specific objective of this survey was to discover whether new developments in obstetric anaesthesia have been incorporated into clinical practice. METHODS: A postal survey was sent to all anaesthetists with a clinical commitment for obstetric anaesthesia in the sites approved for training by the College of Anaesthetists, Ireland. RESULTS: Fifty-three per cent of anaesthetists surveyed responded. The majority of anaesthetists (98%) use low-dose epidural analgesia for the maintenance of analgesia. Only 11% use it for test-dosing and 32% for the induction of analgesia. The combined spinal-epidural analgesia method is used by 49%, but two-thirds of those who use it perform fewer than five per month. Patient-controlled epidural analgesia was in use at only one site. CONCLUSION: It appears that Irish obstetric anaesthetists have adopted the low-dose epidural analgesia trend for the maintenance of labour analgesia. This practice is not as widespread, however, for test dosing, the induction of analgesia dose or in the administration of intermittent epidural boluses to maintain analgesia when higher concentrations are used. Since its introduction in 2000, levobupivacaine has become the most popular local anaesthetic agent.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnalgesia, Epidural/*methods/*statistics & numerical dataen_GB
dc.subject.meshCesarean Sectionen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Health Care Surveysen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIreland/epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshLabor, Obstetric/*drug effectsen_GB
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen_GB
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_GB
dc.titleEpidural analgesia practices for labour: results of a 2005 national survey in Ireland.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Perioperative Medicine, Coombe Women and Infants University, Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. rebecca.fanning@gmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.journalEuropean journal of anaesthesiologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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