An emergency department intervention to protect an overlooked group of children at risk of significant harm.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207997
Title:
An emergency department intervention to protect an overlooked group of children at risk of significant harm.
Authors:
Kaye, P; Taylor, C; Barley, K; Powell-Chandler, A
Affiliation:
Emergency Department, Royal United Hospital, Coombe Park, Bath, UK., philip_bath@hotmail.com
Citation:
Emerg Med J. 2009 Jun;26(6):415-7.
Journal:
Emergency medicine journal : EMJ
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207997
DOI:
10.1136/emj.2008.062547
PubMed ID:
19465610
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Parental psychiatric disorder, especially depression, personality disorder and deliberate self-harm, is known to put children at greater risk of mental illness, neglect or physical, emotional and sexual abuse. Without a reliable procedure to identify children of parents presenting with these mental health problems, children at high risk of significant harm can be easily overlooked. Although deliberate self-harm constitutes a significant proportion of emergency presentations, there are no guidelines which address the emergency physician's role in identifying and assessing risk to children of these patients. METHODS: A robust system was jointly developed with the local social services child protection team to identify and risk-stratify children of parents with mental illness. This allows us to intervene when we identify children at immediate risk of harm and to ensure that social services are aware of potential risk to all children in this group. The referral process was audited repeatedly to refine the agreed protocol. RESULTS: The proportion of patients asked by the emergency department personnel about dependent children increased and the quality of information received by the social services child protection team improved. CONCLUSIONS: All emergency departments should acknowledge the inadequacy of information available to them regarding patients' children and consider a policy of referral to social services for all children of parents with mental health presentations. This process can only be developed through close liaison within the multidisciplinary child protection team.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adolescent; Adult; Child; Child Abuse/*prevention & control; *Child Welfare; *Child of Impaired Parents; Emergency Service, Hospital/*organization & administration; England; Female; Hospitals, Group Practice; Humans; Male; Medical Audit; *Mental Disorders; Middle Aged; Risk Factors; Young Adult
ISSN:
1472-0213 (Electronic); 1472-0205 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKaye, Pen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarley, Ken_GB
dc.contributor.authorPowell-Chandler, Aen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:57:12Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:57:12Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:57:12Z-
dc.identifier.citationEmerg Med J. 2009 Jun;26(6):415-7.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1472-0213 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1472-0205 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid19465610en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/emj.2008.062547en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207997-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Parental psychiatric disorder, especially depression, personality disorder and deliberate self-harm, is known to put children at greater risk of mental illness, neglect or physical, emotional and sexual abuse. Without a reliable procedure to identify children of parents presenting with these mental health problems, children at high risk of significant harm can be easily overlooked. Although deliberate self-harm constitutes a significant proportion of emergency presentations, there are no guidelines which address the emergency physician's role in identifying and assessing risk to children of these patients. METHODS: A robust system was jointly developed with the local social services child protection team to identify and risk-stratify children of parents with mental illness. This allows us to intervene when we identify children at immediate risk of harm and to ensure that social services are aware of potential risk to all children in this group. The referral process was audited repeatedly to refine the agreed protocol. RESULTS: The proportion of patients asked by the emergency department personnel about dependent children increased and the quality of information received by the social services child protection team improved. CONCLUSIONS: All emergency departments should acknowledge the inadequacy of information available to them regarding patients' children and consider a policy of referral to social services for all children of parents with mental health presentations. This process can only be developed through close liaison within the multidisciplinary child protection team.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshChilden_GB
dc.subject.meshChild Abuse/*prevention & controlen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Child Welfareen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Child of Impaired Parentsen_GB
dc.subject.meshEmergency Service, Hospital/*organization & administrationen_GB
dc.subject.meshEnglanden_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHospitals, Group Practiceen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMedical Auditen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Mental Disordersen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_GB
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_GB
dc.titleAn emergency department intervention to protect an overlooked group of children at risk of significant harm.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentEmergency Department, Royal United Hospital, Coombe Park, Bath, UK., philip_bath@hotmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.journalEmergency medicine journal : EMJen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-
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