Gene expression profiling in cervical cancer: identification of novel markers for disease diagnosis and therapy.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207995
Title:
Gene expression profiling in cervical cancer: identification of novel markers for disease diagnosis and therapy.
Authors:
Martin, Cara M; Astbury, Katharine; McEvoy, Lynda; O'Toole, Sharon; Sheils, Orla; O'Leary, John J
Affiliation:
Department of Pathology, Coombe Women's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
Methods Mol Biol. 2009;511:333-59.
Journal:
Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.)
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207995
DOI:
10.1007/978-1-59745-447-6_15
PubMed ID:
19347305
Abstract:
Cervical cancer, a potentially preventable disease, remains the second most common malignancy in women worldwide. Human papillomavirus is the single most important etiological agent in cervical cancer. HPV contributes to neoplastic progression through the action of two viral oncoproteins E6 and E7, which interfere with critical cell cycle pathways, p53, and retinoblastoma. However, evidence suggests that HPV infection alone is insufficient to induce malignant changes and other host genetic variations are important in the development of cervical cancer. Advances in molecular biology and high throughput gene expression profiling technologies have heralded a new era in biomarker discovery and identification of molecular targets related to carcinogenesis. These advancements have improved our understanding of carcinogenesis and will facilitate screening, early detection, management, and personalised targeted therapy. In this chapter, we have described the use of high density microarrays to assess gene expression profiles in cervical cancer. Using this approach we have identified a number of novel genes which are differentially expressed in cervical cancer, including several genes involved in cell cycle regulation. These include p16ink4a, MCM 3 and 5, CDC6, Geminin, Cyclins A-D, TOPO2A, CDCA1, and BIRC5. We have validated expression of mRNA using real-time PCR and protein by immunohistochemistry.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Antigens, Neoplasm/genetics/metabolism; DNA Topoisomerases, Type II/genetics/metabolism; DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics/metabolism; Female; Gene Expression Profiling/instrumentation/*methods; Humans; Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins; Microarray Analysis/instrumentation/*methods; Microtubule-Associated Proteins/genetics/metabolism; RNA, Neoplasm/analysis; Reproducibility of Results; Tumor Markers, Biological/*metabolism; *Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis/genetics/therapy
ISSN:
1064-3745 (Print); 1064-3745 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Cara Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorAstbury, Katharineen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcEvoy, Lyndaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Toole, Sharonen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSheils, Orlaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Leary, John Jen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:57:08Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:57:08Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:57:08Z-
dc.identifier.citationMethods Mol Biol. 2009;511:333-59.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1064-3745 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1064-3745 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid19347305en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-1-59745-447-6_15en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207995-
dc.description.abstractCervical cancer, a potentially preventable disease, remains the second most common malignancy in women worldwide. Human papillomavirus is the single most important etiological agent in cervical cancer. HPV contributes to neoplastic progression through the action of two viral oncoproteins E6 and E7, which interfere with critical cell cycle pathways, p53, and retinoblastoma. However, evidence suggests that HPV infection alone is insufficient to induce malignant changes and other host genetic variations are important in the development of cervical cancer. Advances in molecular biology and high throughput gene expression profiling technologies have heralded a new era in biomarker discovery and identification of molecular targets related to carcinogenesis. These advancements have improved our understanding of carcinogenesis and will facilitate screening, early detection, management, and personalised targeted therapy. In this chapter, we have described the use of high density microarrays to assess gene expression profiles in cervical cancer. Using this approach we have identified a number of novel genes which are differentially expressed in cervical cancer, including several genes involved in cell cycle regulation. These include p16ink4a, MCM 3 and 5, CDC6, Geminin, Cyclins A-D, TOPO2A, CDCA1, and BIRC5. We have validated expression of mRNA using real-time PCR and protein by immunohistochemistry.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAntigens, Neoplasm/genetics/metabolismen_GB
dc.subject.meshDNA Topoisomerases, Type II/genetics/metabolismen_GB
dc.subject.meshDNA-Binding Proteins/genetics/metabolismen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshGene Expression Profiling/instrumentation/*methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshInhibitor of Apoptosis Proteinsen_GB
dc.subject.meshMicroarray Analysis/instrumentation/*methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshMicrotubule-Associated Proteins/genetics/metabolismen_GB
dc.subject.meshRNA, Neoplasm/analysisen_GB
dc.subject.meshReproducibility of Resultsen_GB
dc.subject.meshTumor Markers, Biological/*metabolismen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis/genetics/therapyen_GB
dc.titleGene expression profiling in cervical cancer: identification of novel markers for disease diagnosis and therapy.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Pathology, Coombe Women's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalMethods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.)en_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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