Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207994
Title:
Maternal morbid obesity and obstetric outcomes.
Authors:
Farah, Nadine; Maher, Niamh; Barry, Sinead; Kennelly, Mairead; Stuart, Bernard; Turner, Michael J
Affiliation:
UCD School of Medicine and Medical Science, Coombe Women and Infants University, Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. nadine.farah@ucd.ie
Citation:
Obes Facts. 2009;2(6):352-4. Epub 2009 Dec 17.
Journal:
Obesity facts
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207994
DOI:
10.1159/000261951
PubMed ID:
20090385
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to review pregnancy outcomes in morbidly obese women who delivered a baby weighing 500 g or more in a large tertiary referral university hospital in Europe. METHODS: Morbid obesity was defined as a BMI > or =40.0 kg/m2 (WHO). Only women whose BMI was calculated at their first antenatal visit were included. The obstetric out-comes were obtained from the hospital's computerised database. RESULTS: The incidence of morbid obesity was 0.6% in 5,824 women. Morbidly obese women were older and were more likely to be multigravidas than women with a normal BMI. The pregnancy was complicated by hypertension in 35.8% and diabetes mellitus in 20.0% of women. Obstetric interventions were high, with an induction rate of 42.1% and a caesarean section rate of 45.3%. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings show that maternal morbid obesity is associated with an alarmingly high incidence of medical complications and an increased level of obstetric interventions. Consideration should be given to developing specialised antenatal services for morbidly obese women. The results also highlight the need to evaluate the effectiveness of prepregnancy interventions in morbidly obese women.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Birth Weight; Cesarean Section/statistics & numerical data; Cohort Studies; Europe/epidemiology; Female; Humans; Incidence; Infant, Newborn; Obesity, Morbid/*epidemiology; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Complications/*epidemiology; Pregnancy Outcome/*epidemiology; Prenatal Care; Retrospective Studies; Risk Factors
ISSN:
1662-4025 (Print); 1662-4025 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFarah, Nadineen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMaher, Niamhen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarry, Sineaden_GB
dc.contributor.authorKennelly, Maireaden_GB
dc.contributor.authorStuart, Bernarden_GB
dc.contributor.authorTurner, Michael Jen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:57:06Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:57:06Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:57:06Z-
dc.identifier.citationObes Facts. 2009;2(6):352-4. Epub 2009 Dec 17.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1662-4025 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1662-4025 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid20090385en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000261951en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207994-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to review pregnancy outcomes in morbidly obese women who delivered a baby weighing 500 g or more in a large tertiary referral university hospital in Europe. METHODS: Morbid obesity was defined as a BMI > or =40.0 kg/m2 (WHO). Only women whose BMI was calculated at their first antenatal visit were included. The obstetric out-comes were obtained from the hospital's computerised database. RESULTS: The incidence of morbid obesity was 0.6% in 5,824 women. Morbidly obese women were older and were more likely to be multigravidas than women with a normal BMI. The pregnancy was complicated by hypertension in 35.8% and diabetes mellitus in 20.0% of women. Obstetric interventions were high, with an induction rate of 42.1% and a caesarean section rate of 45.3%. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings show that maternal morbid obesity is associated with an alarmingly high incidence of medical complications and an increased level of obstetric interventions. Consideration should be given to developing specialised antenatal services for morbidly obese women. The results also highlight the need to evaluate the effectiveness of prepregnancy interventions in morbidly obese women.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshBirth Weighten_GB
dc.subject.meshCesarean Section/statistics & numerical dataen_GB
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshEurope/epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen_GB
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_GB
dc.subject.meshObesity, Morbid/*epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen_GB
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Complications/*epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Outcome/*epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshPrenatal Careen_GB
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_GB
dc.titleMaternal morbid obesity and obstetric outcomes.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentUCD School of Medicine and Medical Science, Coombe Women and Infants University, Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. nadine.farah@ucd.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalObesity factsen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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