Day-surgery patients anesthetized with propofol have less postoperative pain than those anesthetized with sevoflurane.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207991
Title:
Day-surgery patients anesthetized with propofol have less postoperative pain than those anesthetized with sevoflurane.
Authors:
Tan, Terry; Bhinder, Rajesh; Carey, Michael; Briggs, Liam
Affiliation:
Department of Anaesthesia and Perioperative Medicine, Coombe Women and Infants, University Hospital, Cork St., Dublin 8, Ireland. tutan@me.com
Citation:
Anesth Analg. 2010 Jul;111(1):83-5. Epub 2009 Nov 12.
Journal:
Anesthesia and analgesia
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207991
DOI:
10.1213/ANE.0b013e3181c0ee9e
PubMed ID:
19910624
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: There have been recent studies suggesting that patients anesthetized with propofol have less postoperative pain compared with patients anesthetized with volatile anesthetics. METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind study, 80 patients undergoing day-case diagnostic laparoscopic gynecological surgery were either anesthetized with IV propofol or sevoflurane. The primary outcome measured was pain on a visual analog scale. RESULTS: Patients anesthetized with propofol had less pain compared with patients anesthetized with sevoflurane (P = 0.01). There was no difference in any of the other measured clinical outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The patients anesthetized with propofol appeared to have less pain than patients anesthetized with sevoflurane.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adult; Alfentanil/therapeutic use; Ambulatory Surgical Procedures/*methods; Analgesics, Opioid/therapeutic use; Anesthesia Recovery Period; *Anesthesia, Inhalation; *Anesthesia, Intravenous; *Anesthetics, Inhalation; *Anesthetics, Intravenous; Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use; Double-Blind Method; Female; Humans; Laparoscopy; Male; *Methyl Ethers; Monitoring, Intraoperative; Morphine/administration & dosage/therapeutic use; Pain Measurement; Pain, Postoperative/drug therapy/*epidemiology; Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting/epidemiology; *Propofol; Prospective Studies
ISSN:
1526-7598 (Electronic); 0003-2999 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTan, Terryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBhinder, Rajeshen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCarey, Michaelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBriggs, Liamen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:56:59Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:56:59Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:56:59Z-
dc.identifier.citationAnesth Analg. 2010 Jul;111(1):83-5. Epub 2009 Nov 12.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1526-7598 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0003-2999 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid19910624en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1213/ANE.0b013e3181c0ee9een_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207991-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: There have been recent studies suggesting that patients anesthetized with propofol have less postoperative pain compared with patients anesthetized with volatile anesthetics. METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind study, 80 patients undergoing day-case diagnostic laparoscopic gynecological surgery were either anesthetized with IV propofol or sevoflurane. The primary outcome measured was pain on a visual analog scale. RESULTS: Patients anesthetized with propofol had less pain compared with patients anesthetized with sevoflurane (P = 0.01). There was no difference in any of the other measured clinical outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The patients anesthetized with propofol appeared to have less pain than patients anesthetized with sevoflurane.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshAlfentanil/therapeutic useen_GB
dc.subject.meshAmbulatory Surgical Procedures/*methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnalgesics, Opioid/therapeutic useen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnesthesia Recovery Perioden_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Anesthesia, Inhalationen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Anesthesia, Intravenousen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Anesthetics, Inhalationen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Anesthetics, Intravenousen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic useen_GB
dc.subject.meshDouble-Blind Methoden_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshLaparoscopyen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Methyl Ethersen_GB
dc.subject.meshMonitoring, Intraoperativeen_GB
dc.subject.meshMorphine/administration & dosage/therapeutic useen_GB
dc.subject.meshPain Measurementen_GB
dc.subject.meshPain, Postoperative/drug therapy/*epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshPostoperative Nausea and Vomiting/epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Propofolen_GB
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_GB
dc.titleDay-surgery patients anesthetized with propofol have less postoperative pain than those anesthetized with sevoflurane.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Anaesthesia and Perioperative Medicine, Coombe Women and Infants, University Hospital, Cork St., Dublin 8, Ireland. tutan@me.comen_GB
dc.identifier.journalAnesthesia and analgesiaen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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