Polycystic ovary syndrome and the peripheral blood white cell count.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207988
Title:
Polycystic ovary syndrome and the peripheral blood white cell count.
Authors:
Herlihy, A C; Kelly, R E; Hogan, J L; O'Connor, N; Farah, N; Turner, M J
Affiliation:
UCD Centre for Human Reproduction, Coombe Women and Infants University Hospital, , Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
J Obstet Gynaecol. 2011;31(3):242-4.
Journal:
Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology : the journal of the Institute of, Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207988
DOI:
10.3109/01443615.2011.553693
PubMed ID:
21417649
Abstract:
This retrospective cross-sectional study examined if the white cell count (WCC) is increased in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and if so, is it due to PCOS or to the associated obesity? Body mass index (BMI) was calculated and body composition was measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis. Of the 113 women studied, 36 had PCOS and 77 did not. The mean WCC was higher in the PCOS group compared with the non-PCOS group (8.9 x 10(9)/l vs 7.4 x 10(9)/l p = 0.002). This increase was due to a higher neutrophil count (5.6 x 10(9)/l vs 4.3 x 10(9)/l; p = 0.003). There was a leucocytosis (WCC >11 x 10(9)/l) present in 19% of the PCOS group compared with 1% in the non-PCOS group (p < 0.001). The neutrophil count was abnormally high (>7.7 x 10(9)/l) in 14% of the PCOS group compared with 4% in the non-PCOS group (p < 0.001). On regression analysis, however, the only independent variable which explained both the increased WCC and the increased neutrophil count was PCOS. We found that PCOS is associated with an increased WCC due to increased neutrophils, which supports the evidence that PCOS is associated with low-grade inflammation. The increase appears to be due to the underlying PCOS, and not to the increased adiposity associated with PCOS.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adult; Body Composition; Body Mass Index; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Humans; *Leukocyte Count; Neutrophils; Obesity/blood/complications; Polycystic Ovary Syndrome/*blood/complications; Regression Analysis; Retrospective Studies
ISSN:
1364-6893 (Electronic); 0144-3615 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHerlihy, A Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKelly, R Een_GB
dc.contributor.authorHogan, J Len_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Nen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFarah, Nen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTurner, M Jen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:56:53Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:56:53Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:56:53Z-
dc.identifier.citationJ Obstet Gynaecol. 2011;31(3):242-4.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1364-6893 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0144-3615 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid21417649en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/01443615.2011.553693en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207988-
dc.description.abstractThis retrospective cross-sectional study examined if the white cell count (WCC) is increased in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and if so, is it due to PCOS or to the associated obesity? Body mass index (BMI) was calculated and body composition was measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis. Of the 113 women studied, 36 had PCOS and 77 did not. The mean WCC was higher in the PCOS group compared with the non-PCOS group (8.9 x 10(9)/l vs 7.4 x 10(9)/l p = 0.002). This increase was due to a higher neutrophil count (5.6 x 10(9)/l vs 4.3 x 10(9)/l; p = 0.003). There was a leucocytosis (WCC >11 x 10(9)/l) present in 19% of the PCOS group compared with 1% in the non-PCOS group (p < 0.001). The neutrophil count was abnormally high (>7.7 x 10(9)/l) in 14% of the PCOS group compared with 4% in the non-PCOS group (p < 0.001). On regression analysis, however, the only independent variable which explained both the increased WCC and the increased neutrophil count was PCOS. We found that PCOS is associated with an increased WCC due to increased neutrophils, which supports the evidence that PCOS is associated with low-grade inflammation. The increase appears to be due to the underlying PCOS, and not to the increased adiposity associated with PCOS.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshBody Compositionen_GB
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen_GB
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Leukocyte Counten_GB
dc.subject.meshNeutrophilsen_GB
dc.subject.meshObesity/blood/complicationsen_GB
dc.subject.meshPolycystic Ovary Syndrome/*blood/complicationsen_GB
dc.subject.meshRegression Analysisen_GB
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_GB
dc.titlePolycystic ovary syndrome and the peripheral blood white cell count.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentUCD Centre for Human Reproduction, Coombe Women and Infants University Hospital, , Dublin, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of obstetrics and gynaecology : the journal of the Institute of, Obstetrics and Gynaecologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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