Irish (Republic) versus British (North West) orthopaedic trainees: what are the differences?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207940
Title:
Irish (Republic) versus British (North West) orthopaedic trainees: what are the differences?
Authors:
Banks, L N; Cashman, J; Mohil, R; Morris, S; McElwain, J P
Affiliation:
Department of Trauma and Orthopaedics, Adelaide and Meath Hospital Incorporating , the National Children's Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin 24, Ireland., louisabanks@hotmail.com
Citation:
Surgeon. 2010 Oct;8(5):259-61. Epub 2010 Jul 16.
Journal:
The surgeon : journal of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons of Edinburgh and Ireland
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207940
DOI:
10.1016/j.surge.2010.05.001
PubMed ID:
20709282
Abstract:
British Trainees have gradually had their working week curtained over the last 8 years. The Republic of Ireland Trainees have not been subjected to the European Working Time Directive prior to 2009 and have therefore worked on average, more hours than their British counterparts. We wanted to see if the differing schemes had an impact on recruiting and training orthopaedic surgeons. We surveyed Republic of Ireland orthopaedic specialist registrars (SpRs) and North West (NW) British SpRs/specialist trainees (ST3 and above) to see if there were any discernable differences in working patterns and subsequent training exposure. A standard proforma was given to Irish Trainees and to NW SpRs/STs at their National or regional teaching (January/February 2009). 62% of Irish and 47% of British NW Trainees responded. Irish trainees were more likely to have obtained a post-graduate degree (p = 0.03). The Irish worked more hours per week (p < 0.001) doing more trauma operative lists (p = 0.003) and more total cases per 6 months than the NW British (p = 0.003). This study suggests that more hours worked, equals more operative exposure, without detriment to the academic side of training. Obviously it is not possible to say whether fewer operations make for a poorer surgeon, but the evidence suggests that it may be true.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adult; Clinical Competence; England; Female; Humans; Ireland; Male; Orthopedics/*education; Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/legislation & jurisprudence/statistics &; numerical data; Workload/*statistics & numerical data
ISSN:
1479-666X (Print); 1479-666X (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBanks, L Nen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCashman, Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMohil, Ren_GB
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Sen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcElwain, J Pen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:50:42Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:50:42Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:50:42Z-
dc.identifier.citationSurgeon. 2010 Oct;8(5):259-61. Epub 2010 Jul 16.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1479-666X (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1479-666X (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid20709282en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.surge.2010.05.001en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207940-
dc.description.abstractBritish Trainees have gradually had their working week curtained over the last 8 years. The Republic of Ireland Trainees have not been subjected to the European Working Time Directive prior to 2009 and have therefore worked on average, more hours than their British counterparts. We wanted to see if the differing schemes had an impact on recruiting and training orthopaedic surgeons. We surveyed Republic of Ireland orthopaedic specialist registrars (SpRs) and North West (NW) British SpRs/specialist trainees (ST3 and above) to see if there were any discernable differences in working patterns and subsequent training exposure. A standard proforma was given to Irish Trainees and to NW SpRs/STs at their National or regional teaching (January/February 2009). 62% of Irish and 47% of British NW Trainees responded. Irish trainees were more likely to have obtained a post-graduate degree (p = 0.03). The Irish worked more hours per week (p < 0.001) doing more trauma operative lists (p = 0.003) and more total cases per 6 months than the NW British (p = 0.003). This study suggests that more hours worked, equals more operative exposure, without detriment to the academic side of training. Obviously it is not possible to say whether fewer operations make for a poorer surgeon, but the evidence suggests that it may be true.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshClinical Competenceen_GB
dc.subject.meshEnglanden_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIrelanden_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshOrthopedics/*educationen_GB
dc.subject.meshPersonnel Staffing and Scheduling/legislation & jurisprudence/statistics &en_GB
dc.subject.meshnumerical dataen_GB
dc.subject.meshWorkload/*statistics & numerical dataen_GB
dc.titleIrish (Republic) versus British (North West) orthopaedic trainees: what are the differences?en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Trauma and Orthopaedics, Adelaide and Meath Hospital Incorporating , the National Children's Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin 24, Ireland., louisabanks@hotmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.journalThe surgeon : journal of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons of Edinburgh and Irelanden_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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