A health and safety survey of Irish funeral industry workers.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207935
Title:
A health and safety survey of Irish funeral industry workers.
Authors:
Kelly, N; Reid, A
Affiliation:
Occupational Health Unit, The Adelaide and Meath Hospital, incorporating the, National Children's Hospital, Dublin 24, Ireland. nualakelly@physicians.ie
Citation:
Occup Med (Lond). 2011 Dec;61(8):570-5. Epub 2011 Sep 9.
Journal:
Occupational medicine (Oxford, England)
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207935
DOI:
10.1093/occmed/kqr131
PubMed ID:
21908770
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Those handling deceased individuals, including the funeral industry, face a variety of health and safety hazards including occupationally acquired infectious disease. AIMS: To identify the knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of Irish funeral industry workers towards occupational hazards and infectious disease in 2009. METHODS: The sample analysed consisted of all listed member premises of the Irish Association of Funeral Directors as at 1 July 2009. A postal survey was sent to each premises in July 2009, with two rounds of follow-up reviews sent to non-responders. Four main areas were covered--occupational hazards, embalming, industry expertise and demographics. The quantitative and qualitative results were analysed to assess knowledge, attitudes and beliefs. Data collection was completed on 31 December 2009. RESULTS: Two hundred and thirty listed member premises were contacted. Twenty-two were unsuitable for the survey. One hundred and thirty-eight valid replies were received from 130 premises, representing a premises response rate of 63% (130/208). Seventy-three premises (56%) identified themselves as embalmers. Embalmers had variable vaccine uptake and variable knowledge, attitude and beliefs towards embalming those with blood-borne viruses. Fifteen per cent of respondents reported a work-related injury, back injury being the most common. Splash and sharps injuries were reported as a work-related injury, and infections believed to be work related were also reported. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates widespread occupational health concerns among this professional group. It confirms the need for occupational health advice and services. There is also a strong desire for regulation of this profession in Ireland.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adult; *Communicable Diseases; Embalming; Female; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Ireland; Male; Middle Aged; *Mortuary Practice; *Occupational Exposure; Questionnaires; Risk Factors
ISSN:
1471-8405 (Electronic); 0962-7480 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Nen_GB
dc.contributor.authorReid, Aen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:50:34Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:50:34Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:50:34Z-
dc.identifier.citationOccup Med (Lond). 2011 Dec;61(8):570-5. Epub 2011 Sep 9.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1471-8405 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0962-7480 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid21908770en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/occmed/kqr131en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207935-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Those handling deceased individuals, including the funeral industry, face a variety of health and safety hazards including occupationally acquired infectious disease. AIMS: To identify the knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of Irish funeral industry workers towards occupational hazards and infectious disease in 2009. METHODS: The sample analysed consisted of all listed member premises of the Irish Association of Funeral Directors as at 1 July 2009. A postal survey was sent to each premises in July 2009, with two rounds of follow-up reviews sent to non-responders. Four main areas were covered--occupational hazards, embalming, industry expertise and demographics. The quantitative and qualitative results were analysed to assess knowledge, attitudes and beliefs. Data collection was completed on 31 December 2009. RESULTS: Two hundred and thirty listed member premises were contacted. Twenty-two were unsuitable for the survey. One hundred and thirty-eight valid replies were received from 130 premises, representing a premises response rate of 63% (130/208). Seventy-three premises (56%) identified themselves as embalmers. Embalmers had variable vaccine uptake and variable knowledge, attitude and beliefs towards embalming those with blood-borne viruses. Fifteen per cent of respondents reported a work-related injury, back injury being the most common. Splash and sharps injuries were reported as a work-related injury, and infections believed to be work related were also reported. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates widespread occupational health concerns among this professional group. It confirms the need for occupational health advice and services. There is also a strong desire for regulation of this profession in Ireland.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Communicable Diseasesen_GB
dc.subject.meshEmbalmingen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practiceen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIrelanden_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Mortuary Practiceen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Occupational Exposureen_GB
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_GB
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_GB
dc.titleA health and safety survey of Irish funeral industry workers.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentOccupational Health Unit, The Adelaide and Meath Hospital, incorporating the, National Children's Hospital, Dublin 24, Ireland. nualakelly@physicians.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalOccupational medicine (Oxford, England)en_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.