Pedestrian fatalities and injuries involving Irish older people.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207928
Title:
Pedestrian fatalities and injuries involving Irish older people.
Authors:
Martin, A J; Hand, E B; Trace, F; O'Neill, D
Affiliation:
Centre for Ageing, Neuroscience and the Humanities, Adelaide and Meath Hospital, , Dublin, Ireland. alanmartin@physicians.ie
Citation:
Gerontology. 2010;56(3):266-71. Epub 2009 Nov 11.
Journal:
Gerontology
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207928
DOI:
10.1159/000258052
PubMed ID:
19907137
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: It has been established internationally that road traffic accidents (RTAs) involving older drivers follow clearly different patterns of timing, location and outcomes from those of younger age groups. Older pedestrians are also a vulnerable group and fewer analyses have been undertaken of the phenomenology of their injuries and fatalities. We studied the pattern of pedestrian RTAs in Ireland over a five-year period with the aim of identifying differences between older pedestrians (aged 65 or older) and younger adults. METHODS: We examined the datasets of the Irish National Road Authority (now the Road Safety Authority) from 1998-2002. We analysed patterns of crashes involving older pedestrians (aged 65) and compared them with younger adults (aged 18-64). RESULTS: Older people represented 36% (n = 134) of pedestrian fatalities and 23% of serious injuries while they only account for 19% of total RTAs. Mortality in RTA is more than doubled for older pedestrians compared to younger adults (RR 2.30). Most accidents involving older pedestrians happen in daylight with good visibility (56%) and in good weather conditions (77%). CONCLUSIONS: Older pedestrians are particularly vulnerable in RTAs. These occur more frequently during daylight hours and in good weather conditions. This may point to a need for prevention strategies that are targeted at the traffic environment and other road users rather than at older people.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Accidents, Traffic/*mortality/prevention & control/*statistics & numerical data; Adolescent; Adult; Age Factors; Aged; Environment Design; Humans; Ireland/epidemiology; Middle Aged; Risk Factors; Walking; Weather; Wounds and Injuries/*epidemiology; Young Adult
ISSN:
1423-0003 (Electronic); 0304-324X (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMartin, A Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHand, E Ben_GB
dc.contributor.authorTrace, Fen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Neill, Den_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:50:22Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:50:22Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:50:22Z-
dc.identifier.citationGerontology. 2010;56(3):266-71. Epub 2009 Nov 11.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1423-0003 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0304-324X (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid19907137en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000258052en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207928-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: It has been established internationally that road traffic accidents (RTAs) involving older drivers follow clearly different patterns of timing, location and outcomes from those of younger age groups. Older pedestrians are also a vulnerable group and fewer analyses have been undertaken of the phenomenology of their injuries and fatalities. We studied the pattern of pedestrian RTAs in Ireland over a five-year period with the aim of identifying differences between older pedestrians (aged 65 or older) and younger adults. METHODS: We examined the datasets of the Irish National Road Authority (now the Road Safety Authority) from 1998-2002. We analysed patterns of crashes involving older pedestrians (aged 65) and compared them with younger adults (aged 18-64). RESULTS: Older people represented 36% (n = 134) of pedestrian fatalities and 23% of serious injuries while they only account for 19% of total RTAs. Mortality in RTA is more than doubled for older pedestrians compared to younger adults (RR 2.30). Most accidents involving older pedestrians happen in daylight with good visibility (56%) and in good weather conditions (77%). CONCLUSIONS: Older pedestrians are particularly vulnerable in RTAs. These occur more frequently during daylight hours and in good weather conditions. This may point to a need for prevention strategies that are targeted at the traffic environment and other road users rather than at older people.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAccidents, Traffic/*mortality/prevention & control/*statistics & numerical dataen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshAge Factorsen_GB
dc.subject.meshAgeden_GB
dc.subject.meshEnvironment Designen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIreland/epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_GB
dc.subject.meshWalkingen_GB
dc.subject.meshWeatheren_GB
dc.subject.meshWounds and Injuries/*epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_GB
dc.titlePedestrian fatalities and injuries involving Irish older people.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentCentre for Ageing, Neuroscience and the Humanities, Adelaide and Meath Hospital, , Dublin, Ireland. alanmartin@physicians.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalGerontologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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