The imaging appearances of calyceal diverticula complicated by uroliathasis.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207924
Title:
The imaging appearances of calyceal diverticula complicated by uroliathasis.
Authors:
Stunell, H; McNeill, G; Browne, R F J; Grainger, R; Torreggiani, W C
Affiliation:
Department of Radiology, Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin 24,, Ireland.
Citation:
Br J Radiol. 2010 Oct;83(994):888-94.
Journal:
The British journal of radiology
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207924
DOI:
10.1259/bjr/22591022
PubMed ID:
20846986
Abstract:
The presence of diverticula arising from the calyceal system is a relatively uncommon urological problem, occurring with an incidence of 2.1-4.5 per 1000 intravenous urogram (IVU) examinations. While the incidence of calyceal diverticula is low, the frequency of stone formation within them is high. We describe the aetiology and clinical presentation and describe the role of imaging with ultrasound, intravenous and retrograde pyelography and CT in diagnosis and planning treatment. We also describe the potential of fluid-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging techniques as a radiation-free alternative to the use of more conventional modalities, such as intravenous urography and retrograde pyelography, in delineating the anatomy of calyceal diverticula before surgical and radiological intervention especially in young patients and pregnant women.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adult; Diverticulum/complications/*diagnosis; Female; Humans; Kidney Calices; Kidney Diseases/complications/*diagnosis; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Male; Middle Aged; Pregnancy; Tomography, X-Ray Computed; Urolithiasis/*diagnosis
ISSN:
1748-880X (Electronic); 0007-1285 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorStunell, Hen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcNeill, Gen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrowne, R F Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGrainger, Ren_GB
dc.contributor.authorTorreggiani, W Cen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:50:15Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:50:15Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:50:15Z-
dc.identifier.citationBr J Radiol. 2010 Oct;83(994):888-94.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1748-880X (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0007-1285 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid20846986en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1259/bjr/22591022en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207924-
dc.description.abstractThe presence of diverticula arising from the calyceal system is a relatively uncommon urological problem, occurring with an incidence of 2.1-4.5 per 1000 intravenous urogram (IVU) examinations. While the incidence of calyceal diverticula is low, the frequency of stone formation within them is high. We describe the aetiology and clinical presentation and describe the role of imaging with ultrasound, intravenous and retrograde pyelography and CT in diagnosis and planning treatment. We also describe the potential of fluid-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging techniques as a radiation-free alternative to the use of more conventional modalities, such as intravenous urography and retrograde pyelography, in delineating the anatomy of calyceal diverticula before surgical and radiological intervention especially in young patients and pregnant women.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshDiverticulum/complications/*diagnosisen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshKidney Calicesen_GB
dc.subject.meshKidney Diseases/complications/*diagnosisen_GB
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imagingen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen_GB
dc.subject.meshTomography, X-Ray Computeden_GB
dc.subject.meshUrolithiasis/*diagnosisen_GB
dc.titleThe imaging appearances of calyceal diverticula complicated by uroliathasis.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Radiology, Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin 24,, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalThe British journal of radiologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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