European obesity and the radiology department. What can we do to help?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207923
Title:
European obesity and the radiology department. What can we do to help?
Authors:
Buckley, O; Ward, E; Ryan, A; Colin, Walsh; Snow, A; Torreggiani, W C
Affiliation:
Department of Radiology, Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
Eur Radiol. 2009 Feb;19(2):298-309. Epub 2008 Aug 27.
Journal:
European radiology
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207923
DOI:
10.1007/s00330-008-1154-z
PubMed ID:
18751711
Abstract:
Obesity is a chronic disease that is now a global epidemic. The numbers of obese people are exponentially rising in Europe, and it is projected that in Europe by 2010 there will be 150 million obese people. The obesity-related health crisis does not only affect adults, with one in four European children now overweight. Radiologists, both adult and paediatric, need to be aware of the magnitude of the problem, and obese patients cannot be denied radiologic evaluation due to their size. Missed diagnosis, appointment cancellation and embarrassing situations for patients when they are referred for a radiological examination for which they are not suitable are all issues that can be avoided if careful provision is made to accommodate the needs of the obese patient requiring radiologic evaluation. This paper will discuss the epidemiology of obesity and the role of radiology in the assessment of obesity and disorders of fat metabolism. The limitations obesity poses to current radiological equipment and how the radiologist can optimise imaging in the obese patient will be described. Dose reference levels and dose control are discussed. Examples of how obesity both hinders and helps the radiologist will be illustrated. Techniques and pre-procedural preparation to help the obese patient in the interventional suite are discussed.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adolescent; Adult; Child; Equipment Design; Europe; Female; Fluoroscopy/methods; Humans; Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods; Male; Obesity/diagnosis/*epidemiology/*therapy; Radiology/*methods; Radiometry/methods; Tomography, X-Ray Computed; Ultrasonography/methods
ISSN:
1432-1084 (Electronic); 0938-7994 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBuckley, Oen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWard, Een_GB
dc.contributor.authorRyan, Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorColin, Walshen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSnow, Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTorreggiani, W Cen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:50:13Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:50:13Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:50:13Z-
dc.identifier.citationEur Radiol. 2009 Feb;19(2):298-309. Epub 2008 Aug 27.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1432-1084 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0938-7994 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid18751711en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00330-008-1154-zen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207923-
dc.description.abstractObesity is a chronic disease that is now a global epidemic. The numbers of obese people are exponentially rising in Europe, and it is projected that in Europe by 2010 there will be 150 million obese people. The obesity-related health crisis does not only affect adults, with one in four European children now overweight. Radiologists, both adult and paediatric, need to be aware of the magnitude of the problem, and obese patients cannot be denied radiologic evaluation due to their size. Missed diagnosis, appointment cancellation and embarrassing situations for patients when they are referred for a radiological examination for which they are not suitable are all issues that can be avoided if careful provision is made to accommodate the needs of the obese patient requiring radiologic evaluation. This paper will discuss the epidemiology of obesity and the role of radiology in the assessment of obesity and disorders of fat metabolism. The limitations obesity poses to current radiological equipment and how the radiologist can optimise imaging in the obese patient will be described. Dose reference levels and dose control are discussed. Examples of how obesity both hinders and helps the radiologist will be illustrated. Techniques and pre-procedural preparation to help the obese patient in the interventional suite are discussed.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshChilden_GB
dc.subject.meshEquipment Designen_GB
dc.subject.meshEuropeen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshFluoroscopy/methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging/methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshObesity/diagnosis/*epidemiology/*therapyen_GB
dc.subject.meshRadiology/*methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshRadiometry/methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshTomography, X-Ray Computeden_GB
dc.subject.meshUltrasonography/methodsen_GB
dc.titleEuropean obesity and the radiology department. What can we do to help?en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Radiology, Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalEuropean radiologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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