Junior doctors and undergraduate teaching: the influence of gender on the provision of medical education.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207922
Title:
Junior doctors and undergraduate teaching: the influence of gender on the provision of medical education.
Authors:
Prichard, David; Collins, Niamh; Boohan, Mairead; Wall, Catherine
Affiliation:
Department of Nephrology, Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Incorporating the National, Children's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
Teach Learn Med. 2011 Apr;23(2):155-60.
Journal:
Teaching and learning in medicine
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207922
DOI:
10.1080/10401334.2011.561754
PubMed ID:
21516603
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: International experience has demonstrated that the medical profession is becoming less dominated by men. This "feminization of medicine" has been a topic of much debate in the medical literature. As the gender ratio in the profession changes, it is likely that a greater proportion of undergraduate education will be provided by women. Whether this shift away from the male-dominated provision of medical education will have an effect on undergraduate education is unknown. PURPOSE: The aim of this research was to clarify whether there are differences between the attitudes and practices of male and female junior doctors regarding the practice of undergraduate teaching. METHOD: A survey methodology among a cohort of nonconsultant hospital doctors in a major Irish teaching hospital was utilized. The overall response rate was 93%. The cohort held a positive attitude toward teaching undergraduates, and the majority were actively engaged in this activity. Doctors of both genders expressed a willingness to undertake teacher training. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between the genders regarding the self-reported quantity of teaching provided to undergraduates. Male doctors perceived themselves as more confident educators when compared to female doctors, but this is likely to reflect cohort demographics in which a greater proportion of male doctors were more senior. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that male and female doctors have similar attitudes toward, and practices in, voluntary undergraduate teaching. As a result, any gender shift in medicine is unlikely to result in a significant change in junior doctors' attitudes toward undergraduate medical education.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Data Collection; *Education, Medical, Undergraduate; Female; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Hospitals, Teaching; Humans; Ireland; Male; *Medical Staff, Hospital; Sex Factors; *Teaching
ISSN:
1532-8015 (Electronic); 1040-1334 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPrichard, Daviden_GB
dc.contributor.authorCollins, Niamhen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBoohan, Maireaden_GB
dc.contributor.authorWall, Catherineen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:50:11Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:50:11Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:50:11Z-
dc.identifier.citationTeach Learn Med. 2011 Apr;23(2):155-60.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1532-8015 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1040-1334 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid21516603en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10401334.2011.561754en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207922-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: International experience has demonstrated that the medical profession is becoming less dominated by men. This "feminization of medicine" has been a topic of much debate in the medical literature. As the gender ratio in the profession changes, it is likely that a greater proportion of undergraduate education will be provided by women. Whether this shift away from the male-dominated provision of medical education will have an effect on undergraduate education is unknown. PURPOSE: The aim of this research was to clarify whether there are differences between the attitudes and practices of male and female junior doctors regarding the practice of undergraduate teaching. METHOD: A survey methodology among a cohort of nonconsultant hospital doctors in a major Irish teaching hospital was utilized. The overall response rate was 93%. The cohort held a positive attitude toward teaching undergraduates, and the majority were actively engaged in this activity. Doctors of both genders expressed a willingness to undertake teacher training. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between the genders regarding the self-reported quantity of teaching provided to undergraduates. Male doctors perceived themselves as more confident educators when compared to female doctors, but this is likely to reflect cohort demographics in which a greater proportion of male doctors were more senior. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that male and female doctors have similar attitudes toward, and practices in, voluntary undergraduate teaching. As a result, any gender shift in medicine is unlikely to result in a significant change in junior doctors' attitudes toward undergraduate medical education.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshData Collectionen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Education, Medical, Undergraduateen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practiceen_GB
dc.subject.meshHospitals, Teachingen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIrelanden_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Medical Staff, Hospitalen_GB
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Teachingen_GB
dc.titleJunior doctors and undergraduate teaching: the influence of gender on the provision of medical education.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Nephrology, Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Incorporating the National, Children's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalTeaching and learning in medicineen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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