Neural correlates of treatment outcome in major depression.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207911
Title:
Neural correlates of treatment outcome in major depression.
Authors:
Lisiecka, Danuta; Meisenzahl, Eva; Scheuerecker, Johanna; Schoepf, Veronica; Whitty, Peter; Chaney, Aisling; Moeller, Hans-Juergen; Wiesmann, Martin; Frodl, Thomas
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine & Trinity College Institute of, Neuroscience, Integrated Neuroimaging, The Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Incorporating the National Children's Hospital (AMiNCH), & St James's Hospital,, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
Int J Neuropsychopharmacol. 2011 May;14(4):521-34. Epub 2010 Dec 23.
Journal:
The international journal of neuropsychopharmacology / official scientific, journal of the Collegium Internationale Neuropsychopharmacologicum (CINP)
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207911
DOI:
10.1017/S1461145710001513
PubMed ID:
21205435
Abstract:
There is a need to identify clinically useful biomarkers in major depressive disorder (MDD). In this context the functional connectivity of the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) to other areas of the affect regulation circuit is of interest. The aim of this study was to identify neural changes during antidepressant treatment and correlates associated with the treatment outcome. In an exploratory analysis it was investigated whether functional connectivity measures moderated a response to mirtazapine and venlafaxine. Twenty-three drug-free patients with MDD were recruited from the Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy of the Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich. The patients were subjected to a 4-wk randomized clinical trial with two common antidepressants, venlafaxine or mirtazapine. Functional connectivity of the OFC, derived from functional magnetic resonance imaging with an emotional face-matching task, was measured before and after the trial. Higher OFC connectivity with the left motor areas and the OFC regions prior to the trial characterized responders (p<0.05, false discovery rate). The treatment non-responders were characterized by higher OFC-cerebellum connectivity. The strength of response was positively correlated with functional coupling between left OFC and the caudate nuclei and thalami. Differences in longitudinal changes were detected between venlafaxine and mirtazapine treatment in the motor areas, cerebellum, cingulate gyrus and angular gyrus. These results indicate that OFC functional connectivity might be useful as a marker for therapy response to mirtazapine and venlafaxine and to reconstruct the differences in their mechanism of action.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adult; Affect/*drug effects; Antidepressive Agents/administration & dosage/*therapeutic use; Biological Markers/analysis; Cerebral Cortex/physiopathology; Cyclohexanols/administration & dosage/*therapeutic use; Depressive Disorder, Major/*drug therapy/physiopathology/psychology; Face; Female; Frontal Lobe/*physiopathology; Humans; Male; Mianserin/administration & dosage/*analogs & derivatives/therapeutic use; Middle Aged; Nerve Net/*drug effects/physiopathology; Psychiatric Status Rating Scales; Treatment Outcome; Young Adult
ISSN:
1469-5111 (Electronic); 1461-1457 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLisiecka, Danutaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMeisenzahl, Evaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorScheuerecker, Johannaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSchoepf, Veronicaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWhitty, Peteren_GB
dc.contributor.authorChaney, Aislingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMoeller, Hans-Juergenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWiesmann, Martinen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFrodl, Thomasen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:49:52Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:49:52Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:49:52Z-
dc.identifier.citationInt J Neuropsychopharmacol. 2011 May;14(4):521-34. Epub 2010 Dec 23.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1469-5111 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1461-1457 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid21205435en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S1461145710001513en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207911-
dc.description.abstractThere is a need to identify clinically useful biomarkers in major depressive disorder (MDD). In this context the functional connectivity of the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) to other areas of the affect regulation circuit is of interest. The aim of this study was to identify neural changes during antidepressant treatment and correlates associated with the treatment outcome. In an exploratory analysis it was investigated whether functional connectivity measures moderated a response to mirtazapine and venlafaxine. Twenty-three drug-free patients with MDD were recruited from the Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy of the Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich. The patients were subjected to a 4-wk randomized clinical trial with two common antidepressants, venlafaxine or mirtazapine. Functional connectivity of the OFC, derived from functional magnetic resonance imaging with an emotional face-matching task, was measured before and after the trial. Higher OFC connectivity with the left motor areas and the OFC regions prior to the trial characterized responders (p<0.05, false discovery rate). The treatment non-responders were characterized by higher OFC-cerebellum connectivity. The strength of response was positively correlated with functional coupling between left OFC and the caudate nuclei and thalami. Differences in longitudinal changes were detected between venlafaxine and mirtazapine treatment in the motor areas, cerebellum, cingulate gyrus and angular gyrus. These results indicate that OFC functional connectivity might be useful as a marker for therapy response to mirtazapine and venlafaxine and to reconstruct the differences in their mechanism of action.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshAffect/*drug effectsen_GB
dc.subject.meshAntidepressive Agents/administration & dosage/*therapeutic useen_GB
dc.subject.meshBiological Markers/analysisen_GB
dc.subject.meshCerebral Cortex/physiopathologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshCyclohexanols/administration & dosage/*therapeutic useen_GB
dc.subject.meshDepressive Disorder, Major/*drug therapy/physiopathology/psychologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshFaceen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshFrontal Lobe/*physiopathologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMianserin/administration & dosage/*analogs & derivatives/therapeutic useen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshNerve Net/*drug effects/physiopathologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshPsychiatric Status Rating Scalesen_GB
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_GB
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_GB
dc.titleNeural correlates of treatment outcome in major depression.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry, School of Medicine & Trinity College Institute of, Neuroscience, Integrated Neuroimaging, The Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Incorporating the National Children's Hospital (AMiNCH), & St James's Hospital,, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalThe international journal of neuropsychopharmacology / official scientific, journal of the Collegium Internationale Neuropsychopharmacologicum (CINP)en_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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