Scrotal signs and symptoms in the general population, the value of testis self-examination and the pitfalls of a scrotal screening programme: is the two-week rule relevant?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207907
Title:
Scrotal signs and symptoms in the general population, the value of testis self-examination and the pitfalls of a scrotal screening programme: is the two-week rule relevant?
Authors:
Casey, R G; Grainger, R; Butler, M; McDermott, T E D; Thornhill, J A
Affiliation:
Department of Urology, Adelaide and Meath Hospital (Incorporating the National, Children's Hospital), Tallaght, Dublin 24, Ireland. Marjorie.whiteflynn@amnch.ie
Citation:
World J Urol. 2011 Jun;29(3):387-91. Epub 2010 Apr 13.
Journal:
World journal of urology
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207907
DOI:
10.1007/s00345-010-0547-1
PubMed ID:
20387068
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Testicular symptoms/lumps are a cause of concern, anxiety and possible diagnostic dilemma for patient and general practitioner. The majority of scrotal pathology is benign in nature and results in a huge workload. The main aim of this study was to determine the relationship between scrotal symptoms, previous scrotal surgery, testicular self-examination and awareness of scrotal abnormalities. Secondarily, we sought to determine the scrotal findings in men enrolled in a consultant urologist-directed screening programme. METHODS: There were 677 men surveyed on their performance of TSE. They were also asked about scrotal symptoms and prior surgery, before undergoing blinded physical examination by one of four consultant urologists. RESULTS: Among the participants, 9.8% of men had scrotal symptoms with 55% of these having a normal scrotal examination and the rest having benign pathology. A number of men who had undergone previous scrotal surgery (13%) had no clinical findings detected on scrotal examination. No subject was found to have testis cancer; 20.9% had a benign scrotal or inguinal condition detected with the majority (65%) not aware of the abnormality. Men who demonstrate a superior awareness of their scrotal abnormalities were more likely to perform TSE. CONCLUSIONS: Increased awareness of scrotal abnormalities combined with TSE may have a role in improving detection of significant testicular pathology. However, the high prevalence of benign scrotal conditions, of which most men were unaware, may serve to raise anxiety in the patient and general practitioner. We believe there is no role for a one-stop scrotal anxiety clinic, as the costs do not justify the benefits.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Cost-Benefit Analysis; Early Detection of Cancer/economics/*methods; Health Education/methods; Health Surveys; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Prevalence; Scrotum/*abnormalities; Self-Examination/economics/*methods; Testicular Neoplasms/*diagnosis/epidemiology/pathology; Testis/*anatomy & histology; Time Factors; Young Adult
ISSN:
1433-8726 (Electronic); 0724-4983 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCasey, R Gen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGrainger, Ren_GB
dc.contributor.authorButler, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcDermott, T E Den_GB
dc.contributor.authorThornhill, J Aen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:49:44Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:49:44Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:49:44Z-
dc.identifier.citationWorld J Urol. 2011 Jun;29(3):387-91. Epub 2010 Apr 13.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1433-8726 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0724-4983 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid20387068en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00345-010-0547-1en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207907-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Testicular symptoms/lumps are a cause of concern, anxiety and possible diagnostic dilemma for patient and general practitioner. The majority of scrotal pathology is benign in nature and results in a huge workload. The main aim of this study was to determine the relationship between scrotal symptoms, previous scrotal surgery, testicular self-examination and awareness of scrotal abnormalities. Secondarily, we sought to determine the scrotal findings in men enrolled in a consultant urologist-directed screening programme. METHODS: There were 677 men surveyed on their performance of TSE. They were also asked about scrotal symptoms and prior surgery, before undergoing blinded physical examination by one of four consultant urologists. RESULTS: Among the participants, 9.8% of men had scrotal symptoms with 55% of these having a normal scrotal examination and the rest having benign pathology. A number of men who had undergone previous scrotal surgery (13%) had no clinical findings detected on scrotal examination. No subject was found to have testis cancer; 20.9% had a benign scrotal or inguinal condition detected with the majority (65%) not aware of the abnormality. Men who demonstrate a superior awareness of their scrotal abnormalities were more likely to perform TSE. CONCLUSIONS: Increased awareness of scrotal abnormalities combined with TSE may have a role in improving detection of significant testicular pathology. However, the high prevalence of benign scrotal conditions, of which most men were unaware, may serve to raise anxiety in the patient and general practitioner. We believe there is no role for a one-stop scrotal anxiety clinic, as the costs do not justify the benefits.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshAgeden_GB
dc.subject.meshCost-Benefit Analysisen_GB
dc.subject.meshEarly Detection of Cancer/economics/*methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshHealth Education/methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshHealth Surveysen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_GB
dc.subject.meshScrotum/*abnormalitiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshSelf-Examination/economics/*methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshTesticular Neoplasms/*diagnosis/epidemiology/pathologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshTestis/*anatomy & histologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_GB
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_GB
dc.titleScrotal signs and symptoms in the general population, the value of testis self-examination and the pitfalls of a scrotal screening programme: is the two-week rule relevant?en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Urology, Adelaide and Meath Hospital (Incorporating the National, Children's Hospital), Tallaght, Dublin 24, Ireland. Marjorie.whiteflynn@amnch.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalWorld journal of urologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.