Variation in the vitamin D receptor gene is not associated with risk of colorectal cancer in the Czech Republic.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207894
Title:
Variation in the vitamin D receptor gene is not associated with risk of colorectal cancer in the Czech Republic.
Authors:
Hughes, David J; Hlavata, Ivona; Soucek, Pavel; Pardini, Barbara; Naccarati, Alessio; Vodickova, Ludmila; Jenab, Mazda; Vodicka, Pavel
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Medicine, Trinity College Centre for Health Sciences,, Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Dublin 24, Ireland. hughesd4@tcd.ie
Citation:
J Gastrointest Cancer. 2011 Sep;42(3):149-54.
Journal:
Journal of gastrointestinal cancer
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207894
DOI:
10.1007/s12029-010-9168-6
PubMed ID:
20585998
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Increased levels of vitamin D may protect against colorectal cancer (CRC) development and recurrence. Accumulating epidemiologic evidence suggests these effects may be partly mediated by genetic variants of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) proposed to be associated with altered risk of CRC. We wished to determine if common VDR polymorphisms affected CRC risk in the Czech Republic, a homogenous European population with a high CRC incidence rate. METHODS: Frequencies of the common VDR gene polymorphisms rs2238136, rs1544410 (BsmI), rs7975232 (ApaI), and rs731236 (TaqI) were determined using allele-specific PCR in a case control analysis of a series of 754 CRC patients and 627 patients without malignant disease recruited from centers throughout the Czech Republic. Unconditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association between these variants and risk of CRC. RESULTS: None of the four polymorphisms tested had any significant effect on CRC risk. No significant differences were observed in susceptibility when the population was stratified by anatomical sub-site, sex, BMI, smoking, alcohol, or presence of polyps. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that common variation in the VDR gene had little effect on its own on predisposition to sporadic CRC in the Czech population.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Case-Control Studies; Colon/metabolism; Colorectal Neoplasms/*genetics; Czech Republic; DNA/genetics; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Polymerase Chain Reaction; Polymorphism, Genetic/*genetics; Prognosis; Receptors, Calcitriol/*genetics; Rectum/metabolism; Risk Factors; Vitamin D/metabolism
ISSN:
1941-6636 (Electronic)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHughes, David Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHlavata, Ivonaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSoucek, Pavelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPardini, Barbaraen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNaccarati, Alessioen_GB
dc.contributor.authorVodickova, Ludmilaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJenab, Mazdaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorVodicka, Pavelen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:49:22Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:49:22Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:49:22Z-
dc.identifier.citationJ Gastrointest Cancer. 2011 Sep;42(3):149-54.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1941-6636 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid20585998en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12029-010-9168-6en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207894-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Increased levels of vitamin D may protect against colorectal cancer (CRC) development and recurrence. Accumulating epidemiologic evidence suggests these effects may be partly mediated by genetic variants of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) proposed to be associated with altered risk of CRC. We wished to determine if common VDR polymorphisms affected CRC risk in the Czech Republic, a homogenous European population with a high CRC incidence rate. METHODS: Frequencies of the common VDR gene polymorphisms rs2238136, rs1544410 (BsmI), rs7975232 (ApaI), and rs731236 (TaqI) were determined using allele-specific PCR in a case control analysis of a series of 754 CRC patients and 627 patients without malignant disease recruited from centers throughout the Czech Republic. Unconditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association between these variants and risk of CRC. RESULTS: None of the four polymorphisms tested had any significant effect on CRC risk. No significant differences were observed in susceptibility when the population was stratified by anatomical sub-site, sex, BMI, smoking, alcohol, or presence of polyps. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that common variation in the VDR gene had little effect on its own on predisposition to sporadic CRC in the Czech population.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshAgeden_GB
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen_GB
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshColon/metabolismen_GB
dc.subject.meshColorectal Neoplasms/*geneticsen_GB
dc.subject.meshCzech Republicen_GB
dc.subject.meshDNA/geneticsen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshPolymerase Chain Reactionen_GB
dc.subject.meshPolymorphism, Genetic/*geneticsen_GB
dc.subject.meshPrognosisen_GB
dc.subject.meshReceptors, Calcitriol/*geneticsen_GB
dc.subject.meshRectum/metabolismen_GB
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_GB
dc.subject.meshVitamin D/metabolismen_GB
dc.titleVariation in the vitamin D receptor gene is not associated with risk of colorectal cancer in the Czech Republic.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Clinical Medicine, Trinity College Centre for Health Sciences,, Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Dublin 24, Ireland. hughesd4@tcd.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of gastrointestinal canceren_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.