Solar urticaria successfully treated with intravenous immunoglobulin.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207875
Title:
Solar urticaria successfully treated with intravenous immunoglobulin.
Authors:
Hughes, R; Cusack, C; Murphy, G M; Kirby, B
Affiliation:
Department of Dermatology, The Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Incorporating the, National Children's Hospital Tallaght, Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
Clin Exp Dermatol. 2009 Dec;34(8):e660-2. Epub 2009 Jun 22.
Journal:
Clinical and experimental dermatology
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207875
DOI:
10.1111/j.1365-2230.2009.03374.x
PubMed ID:
19549230
Abstract:
Idiopathic solar urticaria (SU) is a rare, debilitating photodermatosis, which may be difficult to treat. First-line treatment with antihistamines is effective in mild cases, but remission after phototherapeutic induction of tolerance is often short-lived. Other treatment options include plasma exchange, photopheresis and cyclosporin. We present two cases of severe, idiopathic SU, which were resistant to conventional treatment. Both patients achieved remission after administration of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) and have remained in remission at 13 months and 4 years, respectively. There are only two case reports of successful treatment of solar urticaria with IVIg. In our experience IVIg given at a total dose of 2 g/kg over several 5-day courses about a month apart is an effective treatment option for severe idiopathic SU. It is also generally safe, even if certainly subject to significant theoretical risks, such as induction of viral infection or anaphylaxis.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adult; Female; Humans; Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/*therapeutic use; Photosensitivity Disorders/*drug therapy/etiology; Sunlight/adverse effects; Treatment Outcome; Urticaria/*drug therapy/etiology
ISSN:
1365-2230 (Electronic); 0307-6938 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Ren_GB
dc.contributor.authorCusack, Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, G Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorKirby, Ben_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:48:51Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:48:51Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:48:51Z-
dc.identifier.citationClin Exp Dermatol. 2009 Dec;34(8):e660-2. Epub 2009 Jun 22.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1365-2230 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0307-6938 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid19549230en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2230.2009.03374.xen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207875-
dc.description.abstractIdiopathic solar urticaria (SU) is a rare, debilitating photodermatosis, which may be difficult to treat. First-line treatment with antihistamines is effective in mild cases, but remission after phototherapeutic induction of tolerance is often short-lived. Other treatment options include plasma exchange, photopheresis and cyclosporin. We present two cases of severe, idiopathic SU, which were resistant to conventional treatment. Both patients achieved remission after administration of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) and have remained in remission at 13 months and 4 years, respectively. There are only two case reports of successful treatment of solar urticaria with IVIg. In our experience IVIg given at a total dose of 2 g/kg over several 5-day courses about a month apart is an effective treatment option for severe idiopathic SU. It is also generally safe, even if certainly subject to significant theoretical risks, such as induction of viral infection or anaphylaxis.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshImmunoglobulins, Intravenous/*therapeutic useen_GB
dc.subject.meshPhotosensitivity Disorders/*drug therapy/etiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshSunlight/adverse effectsen_GB
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_GB
dc.subject.meshUrticaria/*drug therapy/etiologyen_GB
dc.titleSolar urticaria successfully treated with intravenous immunoglobulin.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Dermatology, The Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Incorporating the, National Children's Hospital Tallaght, Dublin, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalClinical and experimental dermatologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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