Prevalence of dyslipidaemia in statin-treated patients in Ireland: Irish results of the DYSlipidaemia International Study (DYSIS).

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207864
Title:
Prevalence of dyslipidaemia in statin-treated patients in Ireland: Irish results of the DYSlipidaemia International Study (DYSIS).
Authors:
Horgan, S; Crowley, J; Feely, J; McAdam, B; Shanahan, E; Vaughan, C
Affiliation:
Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Incorporating the National Children's Hospital,, Dublin, Ireland. horgan_stephen77@hotmail.com
Citation:
Ir J Med Sci. 2011 Jun;180(2):343-9. Epub 2011 Mar 13.
Journal:
Irish journal of medical science
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207864
DOI:
10.1007/s11845-011-0702-8
PubMed ID:
21400212
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Statins are proven to reduce cardiovascular risk; however, substantial risk remains in patients on statin therapy. Persisting dyslipidaemia is likely to play a contributory role. AIM: To assess the prevalence of persisting lipid abnormalities in patients treated with statins. METHODS: DYSIS was a cross-sectional study of 22,063 patients in Europe and Canada. 900 Irish patients participated. All patients were >/= 45 years and treated with statins for >/= 3 months. Data were collected from the patients' records. ESC guidelines were used to classify risk and to define lipid levels. RESULTS: Mean age was 66.1 years with women representing 40.7%. 78.6% were high-risk patients; that is 53.9% with cardiovascular disease (CVD), 20.1% with diabetes and 15.9% with a SCORE risk >/= 5%. Total cholesterol was not at goal in 34.4% of all patients. LDL-C was elevated in 30.8% of all patients and in 30% at high risk. Low HDL-C was found in 34.7% of high-risk patients compared to 16.9% of patients with an ESC score <5%. In diabetics without CVD, low HDL-C and elevated TGs were found in 46 and 44.3%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Despite statin therapy, a significant number of patients have persistent dyslipidaemia. While LDL-C targets are suboptimal in three out of ten patients, the prevalence of low HDL-C and high TGs in high-risk patients is greater than one in three. A more integrated approach to the treatment of patients with dyslipidaemia is warranted. Clinical trials are needed to assess the impact of therapies that raise HDL-C and lower elevated TGs.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Aged; Cardiovascular Diseases/blood/prevention & control; Cholesterol, HDL/blood; Cholesterol, LDL/blood; Cross-Sectional Studies; Dyslipidemias/blood/*drug therapy/epidemiology; Female; Humans; Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/*therapeutic use; Ireland/epidemiology; Male; Middle Aged; Prevalence; Triglycerides/blood
ISSN:
1863-4362 (Electronic); 0021-1265 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHorgan, Sen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCrowley, Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFeely, Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcAdam, Ben_GB
dc.contributor.authorShanahan, Een_GB
dc.contributor.authorVaughan, Cen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:48:27Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:48:27Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:48:27Z-
dc.identifier.citationIr J Med Sci. 2011 Jun;180(2):343-9. Epub 2011 Mar 13.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1863-4362 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0021-1265 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid21400212en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11845-011-0702-8en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207864-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Statins are proven to reduce cardiovascular risk; however, substantial risk remains in patients on statin therapy. Persisting dyslipidaemia is likely to play a contributory role. AIM: To assess the prevalence of persisting lipid abnormalities in patients treated with statins. METHODS: DYSIS was a cross-sectional study of 22,063 patients in Europe and Canada. 900 Irish patients participated. All patients were >/= 45 years and treated with statins for >/= 3 months. Data were collected from the patients' records. ESC guidelines were used to classify risk and to define lipid levels. RESULTS: Mean age was 66.1 years with women representing 40.7%. 78.6% were high-risk patients; that is 53.9% with cardiovascular disease (CVD), 20.1% with diabetes and 15.9% with a SCORE risk >/= 5%. Total cholesterol was not at goal in 34.4% of all patients. LDL-C was elevated in 30.8% of all patients and in 30% at high risk. Low HDL-C was found in 34.7% of high-risk patients compared to 16.9% of patients with an ESC score <5%. In diabetics without CVD, low HDL-C and elevated TGs were found in 46 and 44.3%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Despite statin therapy, a significant number of patients have persistent dyslipidaemia. While LDL-C targets are suboptimal in three out of ten patients, the prevalence of low HDL-C and high TGs in high-risk patients is greater than one in three. A more integrated approach to the treatment of patients with dyslipidaemia is warranted. Clinical trials are needed to assess the impact of therapies that raise HDL-C and lower elevated TGs.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAgeden_GB
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseases/blood/prevention & controlen_GB
dc.subject.meshCholesterol, HDL/blooden_GB
dc.subject.meshCholesterol, LDL/blooden_GB
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshDyslipidemias/blood/*drug therapy/epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshHydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/*therapeutic useen_GB
dc.subject.meshIreland/epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_GB
dc.subject.meshTriglycerides/blooden_GB
dc.titlePrevalence of dyslipidaemia in statin-treated patients in Ireland: Irish results of the DYSlipidaemia International Study (DYSIS).en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentAdelaide and Meath Hospital, Incorporating the National Children's Hospital,, Dublin, Ireland. horgan_stephen77@hotmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.journalIrish journal of medical scienceen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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